CITY HALL
EMERGENCY BULLETIN #5
(1 April 1964 (Wednesday)
(Prepared by Karl Armstrong)

HIGH TIDES
Although no official information is yet available and may not be for some time, pre-sent indications and information is that this area settled about 8 feet during the earthquake thus accounting for the high tides we are experiencing. Oscar Dyson said that the fishermen had established their own tidal study and it shows that the tides are on time according to the tide books "the only thing is that the low and high tides are about eight feet higher than they should be." Bays at the south end of the island are NOT experiencing this condition. On the other hand tides in Prince William Sound are about six feet lower than normal, we have been told. Also the quake has blocked the Copper River back in the mountains and there is a prodigious amount of water backing up into a tremendous lake now. What will happen on this has not been reported.

PILFERAGE AND LOOTING
City Councilmen have approved a tightening up of security in the disaster area. This is due to the fact that there have been repeated violations of the pass system and a number of incidents of pilferage and looting. ARRESTS WILL BE MADE OF PERSONS WHO DO NOT HAVE PROPER PASSES AND ARE NOT IN THE PROPER AREAS DESIGNATED ON THEIR INDIVIDUAL

PASSES. FINANCE GROUP
A finance committee has been appointed with Howard Fremlin as chairman. Persons who have suffered losses of any kind of property are urged to IMMEDIATELY pick up forms at both banks, city hall or the post office to fill out and turn in to the temporary office located in the Kodiak Branch, First National Bank of Anchorage. Chairman Fremlin stressed the importance of ACTING WITH SPEED IN FILING THESE FORMS, SO THAT IMMEDIATE ACTION CAN BE TAKEN TO OBTAIN FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE.

APA REPORT
APA AREA SUPERINTENDENT VERN HILLIKER advises that his firm has opened offices in the Donnelley Building above the post office and stated, "Our king crab plant was a total loss but will be rebuilt as time and availability of material will permit. Larsen Bay and Karluk are intact, and with but little work Larsen Bay can be put into operation. Our salmon and king crab fleets have apparently suffered no loss or major damage and, most importantly, all of our employees and fishermen are reported safe and there are apparently no casualties."

NAVY NEWS
Things continue to be tough out at the Naval Station with many places without power and thus lacking heat and lights. City Manager Ralph Jones lauded the "magnificent efforts of the Navy to assist the people of Kodiak despite their own troubles." He noted their lack of power and other comforts and stated, "This entire community is aware of our debt to your people for the wonderful assistance you have given us in our great hour of need and we are more than willing to do anything we possibly can to assist you."

MORE NAVY NEWS
TV remains the only source of entertainment on the Naval Station and continues on 24 hour a day operation. All hands are now on an 8 on 8 off or 12 on 12 off basis according to Comdr. Simon. All clubs have been closed and no liquor is available or permitted to be sold on the base.

CONGRESSMAN RIVERS ARRIVES
Congressman Ralph Rivers accompanied by a part of high ranking federal officials from the nation's capitol conferred with city officials late yesterday afternoon before flying on to other stricken Alaskan communities, "I am apalled at the destruction and misery caused by this great disaster and am returning to Washington immediately to press for massive federal assistance to the people of Alaska, I am particularly impressed with the fortitude displayed by the people of Kodiak, and by the effectiveness of their community leaders during this grave time," Congressman Rivers stated,

CASUALTY LISTS
Eight persons are officially listed on the death list in the Kodiak Island area as of March 31, 1964. They are: Clarence Paul Bledsoe, Virgil C. Layton, Mabel M. Fenner, Rose Marie Schultz, Arlene F. Wallace, Richard P, Vosgien (all of Kodiak), Anakenty Zaedar (Kaguyak) and Donald Wyatt of Los Angeles, California. Listed officially on the Missing Persons List as of March 31, 1964 were the following 14 persons: John Larsen (aboard Spruce Cape of which debris has been found), Lawrence Panamarioff, Al Reft, Eugene Schulz, Bill Jones, Jack Wallace, Maurice Curry, Eddie Anderson, Rudy Anderson, Earl Waseli, George Naumoff, Mary Anderson.

MABEL M. FENNER
A public visitation will be held at the Kodiak Mortuary Wednesday, April 1, 1964, and those wishing to pay their respects may do so at their convenience between the hours of 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.

POWER AND WATER
Persons whose residences are still without either power or water are urged to contact city hall. Most residential areas now have both water and power hooked up, but it is possible that individual residences may have been turned off during the immediate time following the disaster and not listed.

HEGLIN SWORN IN
Harold Heglin was sworn into office as a City Councilman yesterday afternoon.

GIBSON COVE
The road down into Gibson Cove has been started and a road to the Baptist Mission completed. Councilman Oscar Dyson and Pat Cannon report that plans are now well along to begin actual construction of the small boat harbor mooring facilities in Gibson Cove.

BOAT INSURANCE
Mr. James Raeside, marine surveyor for the marine underwriters has arrived from Seattle and has set up a temporary Kodiak office to deal with marine casualties and he can be contacted at the Kodiak Hotel, Room 18, ALL FISHERMEN WHOSE VESSELS SUFFERED DAMAGE ARE URGED TO CONTACT HIM IMMEDIATELY,

SCHOOL
Many school children and all mothers will be happy to hear that schools will begin classes again on Monday, April 6.

RED CROSS
Persons whose homes and personal belongings were destroyed in the catastrophe may find assistance available directly from the Red Cross. Headquarters of the disaster team which arrived yesterday have been set up in the Church of God across the street from the high school.

VILLAGES
Civil Defense Director Frank Irick, reports that food and clothing have been ship-ped to both Afognak and Ouzinkie and everyone with a need in those two communities will be taken care of.

PROPERTY DAMAGE
City Manager Ralph Jones reports that the most recent estimate of property damage in the immediate area now totals $21,850,000.

CIVIL DEFENSE HEADQUARTERS
The Navy has provided Frank Irick with a 3 room house trailer which will be made into Civil Defense Headquarters and located in the Little League Ball Park by the Armory. Kodiak Island Borough Headquarters will also be located there.

TYPHOID SHOTS
Typhoid shots are still being given at the Kodiak Health Center and everyone is urged to get one. All fishermen and persons presently working in the various as-pects of the cleanup and demolition are especially reminded to get their shots NOW.

MORE BOATS
A number of boats which were believed lost or missing have been sighted through an aerial survey. About 20 to 25 boats are believed salvagable according to reports. The fishing fleet has been organized to salvage everything possible. Don Church, State Patrolman, advises that he sighted nine purse seiners floating in the Old Harbor area. It is believed that about 160 boats were inside the small boat harbor here when the tide came in, and in, and in, and in.

FREEZE RENTS
ALL RENTS, BOTH RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL HAVE BEEN FROZEN AT THE PRE-DISASTER LEVEL. CITY ATTORNEY AND MAGISTRATE ROY MADSEN WARNED THAT PENALTIES AS PRESCRIBED BY PRESENT CITY ORDINANCES WILL APPLY IN CASE OF VIOLATIONS.

FUNERAL SERVICES
Funeral services for Virgil C. Layton will be held at 4 p.m. Thursday in the Kodiak Mortuary.

CANNERY TO OPERATE
Bill Kingston, president of Washington Fish & Oyster Co. tells us that all of their boats are covered with marine insurance which he has been assured covers any damages suffered due to the tidal waves. He said their Port Williams facility suffered little damage and they expect to be in operation there on King, Dungeness, and Halibut within a week. He said this may be a limited operation as the uncommonly high tides are of concern.

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