CITY HALL
EMERGENCY BULLETIN #17
(14 April 1964 (Tuesday)
(Prepared by Karl Armstrong)

NO TIDE DAMAGE
Favorable winds and barometric pressure resulted in little or no damage in the immediate Kodiak area during last night's 10.0 tide (according to tide book.) City Police observers were placed at possible trouble spots along the waterfront to report tidal action from about 11 p.m. to 3 a.m. An attempt to float Shell's barge, which has been sitting alongside Main Street(Alaska Way) failed although they succeeded in moving it about fifty feet before it grounded again and the tide turned. Two large vessels and two bulldozers were used in the attempt. The tide gauge behind Kraft's Supermarket registered a 15.5 tide. Reverend Bullock said Wakefield Fisheries at Port Wakefield report no damage.

NORMAL BAR HOURS
The City Council yesterday afternoon authorized the resumption of normal hours of operation for those bars which have been cleared for reopening by health authorities. The authorization became effective at 4:00 p.m. yesterday (Monday)

LOW RENT HOUSING
The Council yesterday approved a resolution which opens the door of the Alaska State Housing Authority for a low rent housing program for Kodiak. City Manager Ralph S. Jones pointed out that under present laws it is possible to build individual dwellings on individual lots or groups of lots throughout the city in areas designated by the City Council. Such low rent housing would be restricted to families with less than $6,000 annual income. The low rent housing owned by the Alaska State Housing Authority would be nontaxable but in lieu of taxes the ASHA would turn over to the city ten percent of shelter rents.

KODIAK MIRROR
The Kodiak Mirror office is now located in the rear of the Employment Office and the entrance is at the rear of the building.

SHAKE RATTLE & ROLL!
THE RUMBLING JOLT THAT STRUCK KODIAK AT 12:57 p.m. TODAY PUT EVERYONE ON EDGE AGAIN AND THE JOLT THAT HIT SEVERAL MINUTES LATER AT 1:11 p.m. HAD A LOT OF PEOPLE NERVOUSLY EYEING THE SEA. THE FIRST JOLT CAUSED PEOPLE TO SHOOT OUT OF CITY HALL MUCH LIKE POPCORN OUT OF A HOT SKILLET! CITY MANAGER RALPH S. JONES SAID APPROPRIATE CITY OFFICIALS ARE IN DIRECT CONTACT WITH FLEET WEATHER CENTRAL AS A PRECAUTIONARY MEASURE SO AS TO GIVE ADEQUATE WARNING IN CASE OF ANY UNUSUAL TIDAL ACTION. CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR FRANK IRICK REPORTS THAT THE SCHOOL TEACHERS, WHO HAVE BEEN BRIEFED ON ACTION TO TAKE IN DEALING WITH ANY SITUATION THAT MIGHT ARISE, PERFORMED VERY EFFICIENTLY TODAY. STUDENTS WERE QUICKLY MOVED TO THE ENDS OF CORRIDORS AND AWAY FROM GLASS WINDOWS. IRICK POINTED OUT THAT STUDENTS ARE ALL ON HIGH GROUND WHERE THERE WOULD BE NO DANGER FROM TIDAL ACTIONS

CLOTHING AVAILABLE
Reverend Don Bullock of St. James the Fisherman Church advised that plenty of clothing is now available at the church for those needing it. Hours are 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon and 2:00 p.m.to 5:00 p.m.

FISHERMEN RAISING FUNDS
Kodiak area fishermen have embarked on their own initiative to raise funds for the Kodiak Disaster Fund of the local chapter of the American Red Cross, according to Chairman Don Bullock. Rev. Bullock said that Lee and Nick Andrichj two brothers who skipper the Merganser and Parakeet respectively, suggested to him the possibility of using king crabs to raise funds for the disaster victims. They pointed out that they had gear out fishing which they had to pick up due to the fact that the Alaska Packers Association cannery had been destroyed by the tidal waves. Mr. Vern Hilliker, APA area Superintendent, called me to tell me that the APA would waive it's share in the crab as long as it was to be used to raise funds for the Disaster Fund. The Andrich brothers offered to take the crab down to Seattle since they had to take the Merganser out for repairs anyway. Bullock said. From this the idea has grown and now arrangements have been made on the Seattle end for holding a huge public sale or auction of the crab. Ivar's Acres of Clams has donated it's processing facilities to cook the crab and television, press and radio media coverage have been arranged along with a public greeting of the Merganser as she arrives in Port. Reverend Bullock today said that every area fisherman they knew of who might have pots out yet had offered whatever crabs their gear had for the fund raising venture. Bullock said the Andrich brothers got about 1700 king crab from their own gear so far and he said any fisherman wishing to have his gear picked for this fund raising venture should contact him or leave word at City Hall or the Merganser. Bullock said that Acting Governor Hugh Wade in Juneau had sent him a wire confirming permission for the shipment of live crab to leave Alaska for processing.

HUMOR
City Manager Ralph Jones recently concluded a long distance conversation and jokingly mentioned that "other than needing lots of money for reconstruction, we are short on snoose (snuff to some!)" In today's mail came a package from the City Manager of Fairbanks containing 12 rolls of Copenhagen! The package containing the money hasn't arrived as yet however.

WAKEFIELD HERE
Lowell Wakefield, President of Wakefield Fisheries, arrived in Kodiak from Washington D.C. this morning enroute to Port Wakefield to observe the effects of the high tides on that facility. He said he feared the Port Wakefield cannery facility would be destroyed by tidal action.

QUAKE REPORTS
The earthquake jolts that struck Kodiak this afternoon were centered in the Kodiak area according to reports from the Fairbanks Civil Defense Office which quoted U.S. Coast & Geodetic Survey reports. The jolts caused little visible damage but may have caused structural damage to the City Hall, Fire Station, and Municipal Library and Museum Building, according to City Manager Ralph Jones. "We shall have more detailed reports on the damage as soon as engineers have surveyed these structures," Jones stated.

GIBSON COVE
Reports from Gibson Cove indicate progress there continues at a fast pace. The boat grid may be ready by Wednesday afternoon and the floats in place by tomorrow night. More dolphins are being driven to afford boats protection from westerly winds. Pat Cannon is now in charge of all activities along the waterfront as Oscar Dyson departed with his Robbie for Seattle where repairs will be accomplished. Before departure, Dyson urged boats who could make it to outside facilities for repairs to do so in order to enable the drydock facilities enroute to be utilized for those boats unable to seek repairs elsewhere.

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