Timeline www.kadiak.org

Timeline

Unless otherwise specified, this action takes place around Kodiak Island, in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska and the Kurile Islands of Japan by the 11th Air Force, US Army.

Quite a bit of the information came from http://paul.rutgers.edu/~mcgrew/wwii/usaf/html/ COMBAT CHRONOLOGY OF THE US ARMY AIR FORCES by Jack McKillop. (If you find a mistake, please let us know at KMHM.)

Kodiak troop movements came from the base history

The Second World War - A Day by Day Account - WWII timeline short but has links

This page created 2005 OCTOBER 26, updated 2013 July 10.

Calendars for 1941 - 1942 - 1943 - 1944 - 1945.


Early 1938
temporary deployments to Kodiak of submarines and amphibian patrol aircraft tested its suitability. [Administrative History of North Pacific, pp. 13-19.]
7 JUNE 1938
Hepburn Board appointed to recommend naval shore facilities.
27 DECEMBER 1938
Hepburn Board recommended air and submarine bases at Kodiak and Sitka.
1 SEPTEMBER 1939
Germany invades Poland.
3 SEPTEMBER 1939
Britain and France declare war on Germany.
SEPTEMBER 1939
Kodiak and Sitka base construction begins.
23 SEPTEMBER 1939
Ground broken on Kodiak base.
10 MAY 1940
Germany invades France.
22 JUNE 1940
France surrenders.
11 SEPTEMBER 1940
Greenslade board appointed to recommend shore facilites.
winter 1940
215th Coast Artillery, 90mm & 37mm anti-aircraft, from Mankato MN, in Kodiak winter 1940 until summer 1944. more arrived 3 AUGUST 1941. more arrived 3 SEPTEMBER 1941 on the USAT Grant. Departed 26 February - 19 APRIL 1944.
THURSDAY, 3 APRIL 1941
Fort Greely activated at Kodiak.
The first group of 250th Coast Artillery, California National Guard, arrived Kodiak on USAT St. Mihiel with 169 persons. The last 12 units left in March 1944. On 20 SEPTEMBER 1941 there were 385 here.
TUESDAY, 8 APRIL 1941
Capt. John Perry, USN arrived in Kodiak. He was the first CO of NAS Kodiak when the station was commissioned 15 JUNE 1941. Later he was 17th Naval District Commandant.
WEDNESDAY, 9 APRIL 1941
Long Island, Kodiak, reconnoitered for location of gun positions.
FRIDAY, 18 APRIL 1941
Army reconnoitered the site of AWS station on Cape Chiniak.
SUNDAY, 15 JUNE 1941
NAS Kodiak commissioned.
JULY 1941
37th Infantry, 2nd Battalion arrived Kodiak, departed 28 November 1942. On 20 SEPTEMBER 1941 there were 1036 here.
SUNDAY, 6 JULY 1941
184th Station Hospital arrived Ft. Greely, Kodiak.
65th Coast Artillery Regiment (AA), replacements arrived Kodiak on USS Spica. More arrived on 23 JULY 1941, regiment left 3 AUGUST 1941.
9th Ordnance Service Regiment, 9 enlisted arrived Kodiak on USS SPICA.
THURSDAY, 17 JULY 1941
USAT Clevedon delivered army personnel to Kodiak.
WEDNESDAY, 23 JULY 1941
65th Coast Artillery Regiment (AA), more replacements arrived Kodiak. Regiment left 3 AUGUST 1941.
SUNDAY, 3 AUGUST 1941
More elements of the 215th Coast Artillery, 90mm & 37mm anti-aircraft, from Mankato MN, arrived in Kodiak. Was in Kodiak winter 1940 until APRIL 1944.
65th Coast Artillery Regiment (AA), departed Kodiak. Had arrived on 6 JULY 1941 and 23 JULY 1941.
WEDNESDAY, 3 SEPTEMBER 1941
201st Infantry Regiment, West Virginia National Guard, had 37mm antitank guns, arrived Kodiak on USAT GRANT.
First 155mm gun moved to Long Island, Kodiak.
151st Combat Engineers, Alabama NG, 161 of Co. B arrived Kodiak on USAT Grant, departed AUGUST 1, 1943.
More elements of the 215th Coast Artillery, 90mm & 37mm anti-aircraft, from Mankato MN, arrived in Kodiak. Was in Kodiak winter 1940 until APRIL 1944.
69th Quartermaster Battalion, 57 of Co A arrived Kodiak on USAT Grant.
10th Ordnance Service Regiment, 64 arrived Kodiak on USAT GRANT.
5 PM: General Mikhail Gromov arrived Kodiak from Nome with two PBY type Russian built aircraft. He was enroute from Moscow to Seattle. There were 47 people in his two planes.
TUESDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 1941
14th Signal Service Company, a detachment of 25 enlisted arrived Kodiak on USAT ST. MIHIEL
over 1000 troops arrived Kodiak on St. Mihiel.
WEDNESDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 1941
over 800 troops arrived Kodiak on USAT Grant.
SATURDAY, 20 SEPTEMBER 1941
37th Infantry, 2nd Battalion, had 1036 in Kodiak.
201st Infantry Regiment, West Virginia National Guard, had 1424 in Kodiak.
250th Coast Artillery, California National Guard, had 385 in Kodiak.
Total Army troops in Kodiak is 5264.
SATURDAY, 27 SEPTEMBER 1941
CHIRIKOF delivered 218 Army personnel to Kodiak.
TUESDAY, 7 OCTOBER 1941
98th Field Artillery, Brty C, and 17 army nurses arrived Kodiak on the Grant.
TUESDAY, 14 OCTOBER 1941
VP-42 left N.A.S., Kodiak. (From base history)
MONDAY, 27 OCTOBER 1941
Brigadier General Charles H. Corlett arrived Kodiak to assume command of Fort Greely.
TUESDAY, 28 OCTOBER 1941
First live program over loudspeakers from what would become the first armed forces radio station at Fort Greely, Kodiak. They went live on radio January 10, 1942.
SATURDAY, 6 DECEMBER 1941
The combat organization of the US Army Air Forces at 2400 hours Eastern Standard Time, 6 December 1941 (0500 GMT, 7 December 1941) is listed below.
 ALASKA DEFENSE COMMAND, US ARMY AIR FORCE,
 Elmendorf Field, Fort Richardson, Anchorage
  28th Composite Gp, Elmendorf Fld
  18th Pursuit Sqd (Interceptor) (20 P-36s)
  36th Bombardment Sqd (Heavy) (6 B-18As)
  73d  Bombardment Sqd (Medium) (6 B-18As)
SUNDAY, 7 DECEMBER 1941
Upon learning of the Pearl Harbor attack, the Command's 6 B-l8's and 12 P-36's take to the air to avoid being caught on their fields.
MONDAY, 8 DECEMBER 1941
Starting today, B-18's fly armored reconnaissance each morning from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage to Kodiak Island.
MONDAY, 29 DECEMBER 1941
In response to repeated requests by this Command to the War Department for additional aircraft to defend Alaska, the 77th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 42d Bombardment Group (Medium), arrives at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage with 13 B-26's.
TUESDAY, 30 DECEMBER 1941
The 11th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor), Western Theater of Operations, US Army, arrives at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage with 25 P-40's.
SATURDAY, 10 JANUARY 1942
Armed Forces Radio Kodiak began a regular broadcast schedule over KODK on 1300 KC/s.
13 JANUARY 1942
At midnight, fire broke out in the holds of the Army transport USAT Clevedon moored at a dock in Yakutat. More - here - and here.
THURSDAY, 15 JANUARY 1942
The Alaskan Air Force is activated at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage. The commander is Lieutenant Colonel Everett S Davis.
THURSDAY, 5 FEBRUARY 1942
Alaskan Air Force is redesignated 11th Air Force.
MONDAY, 9 FEBRUARY 1942
36th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 28th Composite Group, transfers from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage to Ft Greeley, Kodiak Island, Aleutian Islands with B-18s, a B-17 and LB-30s.
TUESDAY, 17 FEBRUARY 1942
Colonel Lidnel R Dunlap arrives from the ZI and becomes Commanding Officer of the 11th Air Force.
SATURDAY 28 FEBRUARY 1942
1586 more 201st Infantry Regiment, West Virginia National Guard, arrived Kodiak on W.C. GORGAS.
SUNDAY, 8 MARCH 1942
Colonel William O Butler assumes command of the 11th Air Force with HQ at Ft Richardson, Anchorage.
SUNDAY, 15 MARCH 1942
XI Interceptor Command is activated at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, Colonel Norman D Sillin commanding. Its operational components are the 11th and the 18th Pursuit Squadrons (Interceptor).
FRIDAY, 20 MARCH 1942
Army Dock, Kodiak is established near the town.
SATURDAY, 18 APRIL 1942
18th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor), 28th Composite Goup, transfers from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, to Ft Greely, Kodiak Island, Aleutian Islands with P-40's? or P-36s (From base history).
MONDAY, 25 MAY 1942
11th Fighter Squadron, 28th Composite Group, based at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, with P-40's sends a detachment to Cold Bay.
TUESDAY, 26 MAY 1942
11th Fighter Squadron, 28th Composite Group, based at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, sends a detachment to Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands with P-40's.
WEDNESDAY, 27 MAY 1942
Japanese submarines I-25 and I-26 launched aircraft reconnaissance of Kodiak.
THURSDAY, 28 MAY 1942
A B-17 flies the first armed reconnaissance from the secretly constructed airfield at Unmak Island, Aleutian Islands over the Aleutian Chain, but finds no sign of the enemy. XI Fighter Command elements are not deployed at Unmak (P-40's and P-38's), Cold Bay (P-40's), Kodiak (P-39's), and Elmendorf Field [P-38's and Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) Kittyhawks].
SATURDAY, 30 MAY 1942
77th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 28th Composite Group, based at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, begins operating from Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands with B-26's.
30th Field Artillery. 777 troops with 155mm field artillery arrived Kodiak on CHIRIKOF.
SUNDAY, 31 MAY 1942
54th Fighter Squadron, 55th Fighter Group (attached to XI Fighter Command) arrives at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, with P-40's.
Late MAY 1942
Admiral Theobald arrived at his headquarters at Kodiak.
JUNE 1942
No. 111 Squadron (Canadian) moved to Alaska
MONDAY, 1 JUNE 1942
During Jun 42, 11th Fighter Squadron, 28th Composite Group, moves from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage to Ft Glenn, Umnak Island with P-40s.
During Jun, 406th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 41st Bombardment Group (Medium), based at Paine Field, Everett, Washington, sends detachments to operate in Alaska with B-18s.
WEDNESDAY, 3 JUNE 1942
Japanese carrier-based bombers and fighters bomb and strafe Ft Mears and Dutch Harbor in several waves inflicting little damage but killing 52 US personnel. P-40s from Cold Bay trying to intercept them arrive 10 minutes after the last attack wave departs. Other P-40s at Umnak are notified too late due to communication failure. 9 P-40s and 6 B-26s fly a patrol but cannot find the fleet-l80 miles (288 km) S of Dutch Harbor- but 2 of the P-40s engage 4 carrier-based aircraft, shoot down one and damage another.

Despite dense fog and rough seas, the Japanese light aircraft carriers HIJMS Junyo and HIJMS Ryujo, supported by the heavy cruisers HIJMS Takao and HIJMS Maya, three destroyers and an oiler, begin launching aircraft at 0325 hours local against Dutch Harbor on Unalaska Island, Aleutian Islands. The is part of the "AL" Operation. Only half of the aircraft reach the objective; the other half either crash into the sea or return to their ships. At 0545 hours, 15 aircraft appear and begin strafing targets at naval installations at Dutch Harbor and the Army's Fort Mears; at 0555 hours, the first of four waves of bombers in groups of three or four, Nakajima B5N, Navy Type 97 Carrier Attack Bombers, Allied Code Name "Kate," release 16 bombs on Fort Mears killing 25 and wounding many others.

P-40s from Cold Bay trying to intercept them arrive 10 minutes after the last attack wave departs. Other P-40s at Otter Point Field on Umnak Island are notified too late due to communication failure. The Japanese cruisers had catapulted four Nakajima E8N2 Navy Type 95 Reconnaissance Seaplanes, Allied Code Name "Dave," to recconnoiter the area west of Dutch Harbor and two of them flew over Umnak and one was shot down and the other was damaged and retreated still unaware of the new airdrome. By 0745 hours local, the Japanese carriers had recovered their aircraft. Meanwhile, nine P-40s and six B-26 Marauders fly a patrol but cannot find the fleet, 180 miles (288 km) south of Dutch Harbor. However, a PBY-5A Catalina of the USN's Patrol Squadron Forty Two (VP-42) flies through a snow squall and locates the Japanese ships. The aircraft is attacked by Japanese fighters but the Americans linger in the area until the composition and position of the force can be determined. The PBY finally heads for home but runs out of fuel and makes an open sea landing where the crew is rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCGC Nemaha (WSC-148). Another PBY-5A of VP-41 searching for the Japanese are shot down and three are captured and taken aboard the cruiser HIJMS Takao. The Japanese torture the three in an attempt to learn the location of the unknown USAAF base but the sailors reveal nothing. The three are taken to Japan and survive their internment.

One Mitsubishi A6M Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter, Allied Code Name "Zeke," is damaged by AA fire and the pilot makes an emergency landing on Akutan Island. However, he was fooled by the flat surface; it is actually a bog and the aircraft flips over killing the pilot. The recovery of this aircraft in JULY 1942 reveals many of its secrets.

Six B-17Es equipped with SCR-521 radar arrive at Kodiak and are immediately dispatched on search missions to locate the Japanese ships.

Additional losses in the Aleutians: 26 Army and 1 Navy were killed, and four quonset huts, one barracks building, and one radio tower were destroyed. All but one of the carrier-based air returned safely but two of four Pete floatplanes were shot down late in the day when they were ambushed by P-40's from Cold Bay.

Anti-aircraft fire from the few US Navy weapons was heavy but ineffective due to the siting of the weapons. The US Army's 206th CA (AA) was ashore and well-sited but the commander refused to allow it to open fire from concerns about revealing its location. Accurate fire was returned from the SS PRESIDENT FILLMORE, moored in the harbor, which had G/260th CA (AA) (often but inaccurately listed as G/503rd CA (AA) on board with its guns on deck through the foresight of then 1st Lt Perry Faust. The Port Captain later credited this unit for its performance and noted that he had thought the ship had exploded, so heavy was the fire being returned from the ship.

The Port Engineer had only recently completed the pier at Dutch Harbor, a example of really solid engineering due to the extreme depth of the harbor. He ran along the dock during the attack and continued to order all moored vessels to set sail lest the Japanese damage "his" pier. He was ignored by the ship's captains. (Marc Small)

*

THURSDAY, 4 JUNE 1942
A carrier-borne force strikes again as 11 bombers, 10 fighters and 8 torpedo bombers attack Dutch Harbor in several waves. 2 P-40s intercept 4 bombers just before noon over Umnak Pass and shoot down 3. During the afternoon P-40s intercept 9 fighters; a dogfight claims 1 enemy aircraft and 1 P-40, the Eleventh Air Force's first combat casualty. AA fire claims another Japanese bomber. During the afternoon 2 B-17s and 5 B-26s attack the carrier force, and 3 more B-26s strike the cruiser TAKAO; no hits are scored; 1 B-24 and 1 B-25 fail to return.
36th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 28th Composite Group, based at Ft Greeley, Kodiak Island with B-17Es and LB-30s, sends detachments to operate from various bases in the Aleutian Islands.
FRIDAY, 5 JUNE 1942
18 B-26s, 10 B-17s and 2 LB-30s search and attack sorties are flown against the carrier force, the B-26s splitting into 3 missions, the B-17s into 2. No contact is made. The B-17s using radar bomb targets which look like ships, but later turn out to be the Pribilof Islands.
SATURDAY, 6 JUNE 1942
Various bomber search-attack missions are flown in an attempt to contact the fleet reported near Seguam Island. No contact is made due to weather. 8 P-38s enroute from Cold Bay to Umnak Island mistakenly attack a Soviet freighter. The Japanese begin to land on Kiska Island.
SUNDAY, 7 JUNE 1942
Japanese troops invade Attu Island. More troops are put ashore on Kiska Island. An enemy airplane is sighted over Cold Bay but cannot be intercepted.
MONDAY, 8 JUNE 1942
1 LB-30 flies armed patrol over Kiska and Umnak Islands and discovers Japanese naval units in Kiska Harbor.
TUESDAY, 9 JUNE 1942
Patrols are flown but encounter no aircraft.
WEDNESDAY, 10 JUNE 1942
Local patrol is flown at Umnak Island.
THURSDAY, 11 JUNE 1942
The 11th Air Force strikes at Kiska Island for the first time. 5 B-24's and 5 B-17s from Cold Bay load bombs at Umnak Island and hit Kiska harbor installations and shipping targets. Low-altitude runs score near misses on 2 cruisers and a destroyer. AA downs a B-24; the other B-24s are pursued by 4 fighters back to Unmak where US fighters drive them off. USN aircraft discover Japanese landing at Attu Island.
Air echelon of 21st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), based at March Field, Riverside, California, begins operating from Umnak Island with B-24s.
FRIDAY, 12 JUNE 1942
6 B-17s and 1 B-24 bomb shipping in the harbor at Kiska Island. A cruiser is heavily damaged and one destroyer is seen burning.
42d Fighter Squadron, 54th Fighter Group, based at Harding Field, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, begins operating from Kodiak, Alaska with P-39s.
SATURDAY, 13 JUNE 1942
An LB-30 flies a weather mission and for the third straight day shipping in the harbor at Kiska Island is bombed by 5 B-17s and 3 B-24s; 2 heavy bombers turn back; the others bomb partially cloud-obscured targets. No effect is observed.
SUNDAY, 14 JUNE 1942
4 B-17s and 3 B-24s bomb shipping in the harbor of Kiska Island from an altitude of 700 feet (213 m), lowest altitude yet. 2 cruisers are hit and one scout seaplane is downed. 2 B-17s are heavily damaged but return to base. The Japanese bomb Nazan Bay, Atka Island.
MONDAY, 15 JUNE 1942
A bombing mission to Kiska Island by 3 B-17s and 2 B-24s is aborted due to weather.
WEDNESDAY, 17 JUNE 1942
A Kiska Harbor bombing mission is cancelled due to weather as is a patrolling mission by heavy bombers.
THURSDAY, 18 JUNE 1942
1 LB-30, 3 B-17s and 4 B-24s make a precision high-altitude attack on Kiska Harbor. A transport is left burning and sinking, another is mauled, and 2 scout planes are possibly shot down. 1 B-24 crashes at sea; part of its crew is saved.
FRIDAY, 19 JUNE 1942
B-24s taking off to bomb Kiska Island abort due to fog. 1 of them and 2 of its crew are lost when forced to land in the water. A B-17 is dispatched to attack a reported submarine but makes no contact.
SATURDAY, 20 JUNE 1942
1 LB-30, 1 B-17 and 7 B-24s take off on a search and bombing mission over Kiska Island. 3 aircraft abort the mission due to weather, 3 bomb through an overcast with unobserved results, and 3 others search in vain for a B-24 lost on the preceding day.
56th and 57th Fighter Squadrons, 54th Fighter Group, based at Harding Field, Baton Rouge, Louisiana begin operating from Nome and Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, Alaska respectively with P-39s.
SUNDAY, 21 JUNE 1942
The War Department authorizes the XI Air Force Services Command, hitherto the Provisional Service Command, which is activated at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage. It is charged with maintaining and supplying all of the 11th's bases. Weather cancels all missions except an armed weather sortie over Kiska Island. Fighters fly local patrols.
MONDAY, 22 JUNE 1942
A B-17 weather reconnaissance aircraft flies over Kiska Island. Fighters fly air base patrols. A bombing mission is cancelled due to weather.
TUESDAY, 23 JUNE 1942
Weather cancels a bombing mission. A B-17 flies a reconnaissance mission over Kiska Island. A P-40 on defensive patrol crashes at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage.
WEDNESDAY, 24 JUNE 1942
Weather cancels bombing. 1 B-17 flies a weather reconnaissance over Kiska Island. Fighters patrol airfields.
THURSDAY, 25 JUNE 1942
2 B-17s, 4 B-24s and 1 LB-30 fly bombing and weather missions over Kiska Island, bombing the N side of the harbor.
FRIDAY, 26 JUNE 1942
5 B-24s drop incendiaries and fire bombs on Kiska Harbor installations.
Captain James Edward Dyer, USN became CO of NAS Kodiak. He served until 28 JULY 1943.
SUNDAY, 28 JUNE 1942
A B-17 weather aircraft flies over Kiska Island. A solid weather front cancels bombing. On this and the following day US advanced reconnaissance parties land on Adak Island from submarines.
TUESDAY, 30 JUNE 1942
A B-17 flies weather reconnaissance over Kiska Island.
JULY 1942
No. 111 Squadron (Canadian) sent a detachment to Umnak
WEDNESDAY, 1 JULY 1942
The XI Bomber Command (Provisional) comprising the 28th Composite Group and its assigned squadrons is activated, Colonel William O Eareckson in command. A B-17 flies weather reconnaissance over Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands and lands early due to weather.
THURSDAY, 2 JULY 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 7 B-24s and 1 B-17 fly photo and bombing missions to Attu Island, which appears deserted, and to Kiska and Agattu Islands; near misses are scored on a transport and a destroyer at Agattu.
FRIDAY, 3 JULY 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 7 B-24s and 2 B-17s bomb Kiska and Near Islands, encountering neither fighter opposition nor AA; results are not observed.
SUNDAY, 5 JULY 1942
A B-17 flies a weather mission.
MONDAY, 6 JULY 1942
4 B-24s and 1 LB-30 fly bombing and weather missions to Kiska Island; results are not observed.
TUESDAY, 7 JULY 1942
1 B-17 and 7 B-24s fly weather, bombing and photo missions to Kiska, Attu and Agattu Islands; all bombs are returned to base due to weather; 1 seaplane is shot down.
WEDNESDAY, 8 JULY 1942
404th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 44th Bombardment Group (Heavy) arrives in the Alaskan Theater with B-24s, originally destined for N Africa; first mission is 18 Jul. In the Aleutian Islands, 1 B-24 flies 2 photo missions over the S shore of Kiska Island and over Little Kiska Island; the bombing mission is cancelled due to weather.
Sometime between 8 JULY 1942 and 13 JULY 1942, VS ID-13 Squadron (later split into two squadrons of VS-49 and VS-70) moved to N.A.S., Kodiak. (From base history)
THURSDAY, 9 JULY 1942
5 B-24s fly photo, weather, and bombing missions to Kiska Island but return with the bombs due to weather.
FRIDAY, 10 JULY 1942
1 B-24 aborts a reconnaissance mission to Kiska Island due to weather.
SATURDAY, 11 JULY 1942
4 B-24s taking off for weather, bombing and photo missions to Kiska Island are attack by seaplane fighters; no losses. A cruiser is bombed with unobserved results.
SUNDAY, 12 JULY 1942
3 B-24s dispatched on weather, photo and bombing mission to Kiska Island abort due to weather.
TUESDAY, 14 JULY 1942
Cold Bay naval airfield commissioned.
WEDNESDAY, 15 JULY 1942
3 B-24s on a bombing mission to Kiska Island turn back due to weather.
FRIDAY, 17 JULY 1942
3 B-17s and 7 B-24s fly weather, bombing and photo missions; shipping is bombed and North and South Heads of Kiska Island are photographed; fighters down 1 B-17.
SATURDAY, 18 JULY 1942
A B-17 flying weather and photo reconnaissance over Kiska Island crashes on Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands.
LAMBERTON (DD-119), high speed minesweeper, arrived in Kodiak.
SUNDAY, 19 JULY 1942
Search missions are flown over Attu and Agattu Islands.
MONDAY, 20 JULY 1942
Brigadier General William O Butler moves advance HQ to Umnak Island. 3 B-17s bomb Kiska Island (especially the barracks) with incendiaries and demolition charges. 4 P-38s try to intercept 4 fighters reported by US Navy aircraft but no contact is made.
TUESDAY, 21 JULY 1942
4 B-24s fly search and bomb missions over Kiska Island but make no contact because of weather.
WEDNESDAY, 22 JULY 1942
Of 8 B-24s and 2 B-17s dispatched to Kiska Island, only 8 reach the target and due to fog drop only 7 bombs with unobserved results; 1 B-24 is missing on the return flight.
TUESDAY, 28 JULY 1942
An air coverage survey for Army ground operations to Adak and Tanaga Islands is flown. Weather cancels a bombing mission to Kiska Island.
WEDNESDAY, 29 JULY 1942
4 B-24s and 5 B-17s bomb vessels and installations in the Kiska Harbor area with unobserved results due to clouds.
THURSDAY, 30 JULY 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 1 LB-30, 9 B-17s and 3 B-24s fly photo reconnaissance and bombing missions to Tanaga and Kiska Islands; the missions are unsuccessful due to weather.
FRIDAY, 31 JULY 1942
1 B-24 and 1 LB-30 fly weather and photo reconnaissance; weather cancels a combat mission to Kiska Island.
Just after 6 AM, submarine USS Grunion was sunk off Kiska by Japanese ship Kano Maru.
SATURDAY, 1 AUGUST 1942
Weather and photo reconnaissance is flown by 1 B-24 and 1 LB-30 over Korovin Bay and North Cape, Aleutian Islands.
MONDAY, 3 AUGUST 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 3 B-17s, 2 B-24s and 1 LB-30 fly a bombing and photo reconnaissance mission to Tanaga and Kanaga Islands and also bomb Kiska Island; 4 of the aircraft have mechanical trouble but all return.
TUESDAY, 4 AUGUST 1942
1 LB-30 flies a photo mission and 2 B-17s and 3 B-24s covered by 8 P-38s escort US Navy tenders to Nazan Bay, Atka Island, Aleutian Islands; two 4-engine seaplane bombers and a possible third are downed near Atka Island by 2 of the P-38s, in their first aerial combat in any theater; weather cancels bombing mission to Kiska Island.
THURSDAY, 6 AUGUST 1942
3 B-24s, 2 B-17s and 10 P-38s provide air coverage for navy tenders to Nazan Bay, Atka Island; photo reconnaissance is flown over Attu Island, Aleutian Islands.
FRIDAY, 7 AUGUST 1942
3 B-24s dispatched to bomb Kiska Island return with their bombs due to solid overcast; 4 more B-24s also depart for Kiska; 1 turns back with mechanical trouble, the others abort the mission over the target due to undercast; 1 B-24, 4 P-38s and an LB-30 fly 2 air coverage missions at Nazan Bay, Atka Island for USN tenders.
SATURDAY, 8 AUGUST 1942
1 LB-30, 3 B-24s and 8 P-38s on photo and bombing missions over Kiska Island cannot attack but Navy PBYs also operating over and off Kiska Island hit freighters and a transport, claiming 1 transport sinking, and score many hits on North Head and Main Camp.
SUNDAY, 9 AUGUST 1942
6 bombers fly armed reconnaissance over Kiska and Attu Islands and hit Kiska Island.
MONDAY, 10 AUGUST 1942
5 B-17s and 3 B-24s bomb Kiska Island targets; fighters and AA down 1 B-24 and only the pilot is saved.
TUESDAY, 11 AUGUST 1942
US Navy Oiler AO-3 CUYAMA arrived Kodiak with men, cargo, and equipment and continued to operate in Alaskan waters.
WEDNESDAY, 12 AUGUST 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 1 B-24 flies photo reconnaissance over Amlia and Atka Islands.
THURSDAY, 13 AUGUST 1942
1 B-24 flies photo reconnaissance over Kiska Island.
FRIDAY, 14 AUGUST 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, a B-24 trying to fly photo reconnaissance over Tanaga and Adak Islands aborts over Kiska Island due to weather.
SUNDAY, 16 AUGUST 1942
A B-24 aborts a photo reconnaissance flight over Adak Island because of mechanical failure.
MONDAY, 17 AUGUST 1942
1 B-24 flies photo reconnaissance over Buldir, Kiska and Amchitka Islands, Aleutian Islands, despite heavy rain.
TUESDAY, 18 AUGUST 1942
A B-24 takes oblique photos of Amchitka and Tanaga Islands; Heavy fog over Kiska and Attu Islands precludes armed reconnaissance.
WEDNESDAY, 19 AUGUST 1942
Mechanical failure prevents a B-24 from flying reconnaissance over Tanaga Island.
THURSDAY, 20 AUGUST 1942
1 B-24 flies photo reconnaissance over Kiska Island; a patrol is flown over Shumagin Island, Aleutian Islands.
At Kodiak, Alaska VP-51 Detachment was relieved of all duty involving flying. All of VP-51's PBY-5 aircraft were turned over to the squadron at Kodiak.
LAWRENCE IV (DD-250) called at Kodiak.
FRIDAY, 21 AUGUST 1942
1 B-24 trying to fly reconnaissance over Kiska Island aborts due to weather.
SATURDAY, 22 AUGUST 1942
A photo reconnaissance mission over Kiska Island is aborted due to overcast.
MONDAY 24 AUGUST 1942
404th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 28th Composite Group, begins to operate from Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands with B-24s. A photo reconnaissance sortie is cancelled due to overcast.
TUESDAY, 25 AUGUST 1942
A photo reconnaissance airplane flies over Kiska, Attu and Adak Islands, then turns back because of mechanical failure.
WEDNESDAY, 26 AUGUST 1942
A photo mission is aborted over Atka Island due to weather.
THURSDAY, 27 AUGUST 1942
4 B-17s, 6 B-24s, and 2 P-38s fly weather, reconnaissance and patrol missions over Kiska and Atka Islands. The Japanese begin to transfer the Attu Island garrison to Kiska Island, which is completed on 16 Sep.
FRIDAY, 28 AUGUST 1942
Of 3 B-17s bombing Kiska Island, 1 fails to return; all available B-24s and 2 flights of P-38s fly naval cover at Nazan Bay, Atka Island; and an attack mission to Attu Island is cancelled due to weather.
SATURDAY, 29 AUGUST 1942
A USN PBY reports a force of 3 cruisers and 4 destroyers NW of Umnak Island; thereupon all aircraft of the 11th go on attack alert; the surface force then identifies itself as friendly.
SUNDAY, 30 AUGUST 1942
US troops occupy Kuluk Bay, Adak Island, amidst a terrific storm and start building a runway. 5 B-24s photograph Kiska Island but do not bomb due to overcast, and then fly patrol and photo reconnaissance over Amchitka and Tanaga Islands. P-38s fly patrol between Great Sitkin and Little Tanaga Islands.
MONDAY 31 AUGUST 1942
Of 2 B-24s flying weather, reconnaissance and patrol missions over Tanaga Island, 1 returns due to weather.
SEPTEMBER, 1942
691st Signal Aircraft Warning Reporting Company, arrived at Lazy bay, Kodiak. (From base history)
TUESDAY, 1 SEPTEMBER 1942
US forces complete the occupation of Adak Island, Aleutian Islands. During Sep, HQ 343d Fighter Group moves from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage to Ft Glenn, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands. The detachment of the 11th Fighter Squadron, XI Fighter Command, operating from Ft Randall, Cold Bay, Alaska with P-40s, returns to base at Ft Glenn.
WEDNESDAY, 2 SEPTEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 6 bombers and 12 P-38s fly cover and photo reconnaissance over Nazan and Kuluk Bays on Adak Island, and Amchitka and Semisopochnoi Islands.
THURSDAY, 3 SEPTEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, of 6 bombers and 5 P-38s off to bomb Kiska Island and flying air cover over Kuluk Bay, Adak Island, 5 bombers and 3 fighters abort due to weather; the others strafe seaplanes and boats in Kiska Harbor and nearby installations; between 1 and 4 seaplanes are claimed destroyed on the water; this is the longest over-water attack flight thus far in World War II; the 2 fighters which reach the target area return from the 1,260 mile (2,028 km) round trip with only 40 US gallons (151 l) of fuel; and the 21st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (under control of the 28th Composite Group), arrives at Umnak Island from the US with B-24s.
FRIDAY, 4 SEPTEMBER 1942
2 bombers and 1 P-38 bomb and patrol Nazan and Kuluk Bays, but bombing of Kiska Island is cancelled due to weather.
SATURDAY, 5 SEPTEMBER 1942
3 B-24s abort the bombing of Kiska Island due to an overcast.
SUNDAY, 6 SEPTEMBER 1942
A B-24 flying patrol and armed reconnaissance over Tanaga Island, Aleutian Islands, sinks a mine layer and strafes a tender as well as nearby tents and buildings.
MONDAY, 7 SEPTEMBER 1942
3 B-24s patrol and bomb Kiska Island Harbor and camp area and also patrol Tanaga Island; they are attacked by 3 sea fighters of which at least 1 is downed.
TUESDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 1 B-24 and 1 B-26 fly photo reconnaissance over Agattu, Attu, and Kiska Islands; the detachment of the 42d Fighter Squadron, 54th Fighter Group, operating from Kodiak with P-39s begins a movement to Adak (the squadron is based at Harding Field, Louisiana).
WEDNESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER 1942
1 B-26 patrols Tanaga and Adak Islands.
THURSDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER 1942
Weather, photo reconnaissance, and patrol missions are flown during the morning over Nazan Bay, Tanaga, Adak and Amchitka Islands; poor weather is encountered at Kiska, Attu, and Agattu Islands; a detachment of the 42d Fighter Squadron, 54th Fighter Group arrives at Adak Island with P-39s (the squadron is based at Harding Field, Louisiana).
FRIDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER 1942
A weather, photo, and patrol aircraft draws AA fire over Chichagof Harbor, Attu Island and also covers Tanaga, Amchitka, and Semichi Islands, Aleutian Islands. HQ 343d Fighter Group is actived at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage.
SATURDAY, 12 SEPTEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, a weather and patrol reconnaissance aircraft finds overcast at Kiska Island but takes photos over Tanaga, Kanaga, and Attu Islands. The runway at Adak Island is completed.
12th Battalion arrives Kodiak with 965 enlisted, 27 officers. They depart Kodiak 12 APRIL 1943.
SUNDAY, 13 SEPTEMBER 1942
14 B-24s of the 21st and 404th Bombardment Squadrons (Heavy) move up to Adak Island. 1 LB-30 and 2 P-38s fly a photo reconnaissance, antisubmarine coverage and strafing mission over Kiska Island lakes and harbor; a tender in the harbor is slightly damaged, 1 float fighter is downed; a P-38 is hit by AA fire and fighters damage the LB-30.
MONDAY, 14 SEPTEMBER 1942
In the first combined heavy mission over Kiska Island 13 B-24s, 1 B-17, 14 P-38s, and 14 P-39s fly low-altitude and photo runs; the P-39s shell 3 submarines in the harbor; the other aircraft bomb and strafe many installations including AA guns and the submarine base; a single aircraft also strafes Segula Island; enemy losses are 5 float planes shot down and 1 flying boat destroyed on the water; 2 mine sweepers sunk and another vessel slightly damaged; while a large cargo vessel and several small barges and vessels sustain hits; 2 P-38s are lost, colliding head-on while after a fighter.
TUESDAY, 15 SEPTEMBER 1942
1 B-17 and 1 B-24 fly armed reconnaissance over Kiska Island, and at Amchitka Island blast buildings in the Constantine Harbor area; fighters strafe Kiska Island Camp area and down 4 intercepting aircraft.
WEDNESDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 1942
The Japanese completes transfer of the Attu Island garrison to Kiska Island, begun on 27 Aug; 1 B-17 and 1 B-24 fly photo and reconnaissance runs over Adak Island.
MONDAY, 21 SEPTEMBER 1942
Bombers fly reconnaissance over Kiska Island and bomb and fire Constantine Harbor installations at Amchitka Island; and the 21st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy) (operating under control of the 28th Composite Group), based on Umnak Island, begins operating from Adak Island with B-24s.
TUESDAY, 22 SEPTEMBER 1942
9 B-24s, 2 B-17s, and 1 LB-30, accompanied by 15 P-39s and 20 P-40s, abort a Kiska Island bombing mission due to weather; photo reconnaissance suggests that Chichagof Harbor, Attu Island is abandoned.
WEDNESDAY, 23 SEPTEMBER 1942
Weather causes a mission abort to Kiska Island; photo reconnaissance over Attu Island confirms it's abandonment by the enemy; a US Navy (USN) PBY escorted by 2 P-38s lands off Amchitka Island with a scouting party which determines that the island is unsuited as an airfield; the P-38s also bomb a radio shack and sink a submarine at Amchitka Island.
THURSDAY, 24 SEPTEMBER 1942
On Kiska Island, 3 B-24s bomb Main Camp, storage dumps, and dock areas, starting several fires.
FRIDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 1942
4 Canadian Kittyhawks and 37 US aircraft bombed Kiska Rufe shot down on Kiska by Canadian Squadron Leader Boomer
9 B-24s, 1 B-17, and 1 B-24 photo airplane, escorted by 11 P-39s and 17 P-40s, fly the first of 2 missions to Kiska Island; Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) Kittyhawks participate in this first combined Canadian-American mission of the Eleventh Air Force; later 2 B-24s and a B-17, escorted by 15 P-39s, pound Little Kiska and Kiska Islands; radar installations at Little Kiska Island are destroyed and explosions and fires are caused in the Main Camp area; other targets include shipping, stores, and tents; the P-39s also strafe 2 submarines; 2 float planes are downed; 5 to 8 biplanes are probably destroyed on the water; 1 large transport vessel is hit and lists badly; and 150 personnel are believed killed.
SATURDAY, 26 SEPTEMBER 1942
1 Jap destroyer and 1 Jap freighter are bombed N of Atka Island at 53-30N 174-20E; 2 near misses are scored on the freighter.
SUNDAY, 27 SEPTEMBER 1942
Shore and harbor areas of Kiska Island are bombed: 8 B-24s and 1 B-17, escorted by 1 P-38, 13 P-39s and 4 P-40s take off first, and are followed by 6 unescorted B-24s; weather turns back 13 of the fighters; an LB-30 flies photo-weather reconnaissance over Attu, Buldir, the Semichi, Agattu, and Amchitka Islands.
MONDAY, 28 SEPTEMBER 1942
2 bombing missions are flown to Kiska and Attu Islands by 7 B-24s, 1 B-17, and 1 LB-30, escorted by 17 fighters; installations on Kiska Island and a freighter nearby are bombed; 1 of the B-24s and the LB-30 bomb the village and Chichagof Harbor on Attu Island and on returning silence AA guns on a freighter; 5 floatplanes are shot down, and 1 submarine is sunk; 1 P-39 is shot down.
TUESDAY, 29 SEPTEMBER 1942
A morning armed reconnaissance mission is flown by an LB-30 over Semichi and Attu Islands; it strafes a ship at Attu Island; 3 B-24s bomb and strafe sea transport, scoring no hits.
WEDNESDAY, 30 SEPTEMBER 1942
Of 9 B-24s off to bomb Kiska and Attu Islands, 2 turn back; the others blast the Attu Camp area, and at Kiska Harbor score at least 1 direct hit and near misses on a ship; 8 fighters intercept over Kiska and Little Kiska Islands but inflict no losses; the detachment of the 57th Fighter Squadron, 54th Fighter Group operating from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage moves to Kodiak with P-39s (the squadron is based at Harding Field, Louisiana).
OCTOBER 1942
Heavy indicator net installed at Kodiak.
THURSDAY, 1 OCTOBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, a Japanese reconnaissance airplane over Adak Island establishes US occupation of the island; 7 B-24s on a search-attack and photo reconnaissance mission over Kiska Island hit hangars and ramps, starting several fires; 4 fighters appear and are engaged; 1 probable victory is claimed; 2 other B-24s take off, after a Navy PBY contact a transport, but cannot locate it.
FRIDAY, 2 OCTOBER 1942
On Kiska Island, 11 B-24s and 6 P-39s bomb 2 cargo ships in the harbor (no hits observed), drop demolition charges throughout the Main Camp area, and hit a hangar S of the seaplane ramp; 4 floatplanes and 1 biplane are shot down. Enemy aircraft bomb the Adak Island airfield without inflicting damage.
SATURDAY, 3 OCTOBER 1942
6 B-24s, 4 P-38s, and 8 P-39s bomb and strafe 7 vessels in and around Kiska Island Harbor hitting a beached cargo vessel and the camp; the fighters down 6 float fighters attempting interception; the enemy bombs Adak Island Airfield but inflicts no damage. The 77th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 28th Composite Group, moves from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage to Adak Island (the squadron continues to operate from Umnak Island with B-25s and B-26s until Dec 42).
SUNDAY, 4 OCTOBER 1942
3 B-24s abort weather, bombing and photo missions over Kiska Island due to weather and instead attack a cargo vessel; the ship's rudder is probably damaged; 1 B-24 is damaged.
MONDAY, 5 OCTOBER 1942
6 B-24s, 3 P-38s and 3 P-39s abort a bombing, weather, and photo mission over Kiska Island due to weather.
260th Field Artillery, Battery B departed Kodiak for APO 980.
TUESDAY, 6 OCTOBER 1942
8 B-24s, 1 B-17, 10 P-39s, and 8 P-38s fly bombing and weather missions over Kiska Island; a large transport is bombed in the harbor which is left sinking; hits are scored on a corvette and on a large freighter at Gertrude Cove and on a hangar in Main Camp; the radio station is damaged; a float fighter is strafed and set afire, and 6 Zekes are hit on the water.
WEDNESDAY, 7 OCTOBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 3 B-24s taking off to bomb Kiska Island and patrol Near Island abort mission due to mechanical failure and instead fly reconnaissance over Agattu, Attu, and Semichi Islands with negative results.
FRIDAY, 9 OCTOBER 1942
7 B-17s and 10 B-24s escorted by 6 P-38s and 4 P-39s bomb the harbor at Kiska Island, installations, and shipping 6 times; targets include shipping in Gertrude Cove, small cargo vessels in Kiska Harbor, installations at North Head, a hangar, Main Camp area (hit several times), and various shore facilities.
SATURDAY, 10 OCTOBER 1942
10 B-24s, 7 B-17s, and 4 P-38s fly 4 missions to Kiska Island; the third mission (3 B-17s) does not make contact; the others bomb and strafe the Main Camp area, hit shipping in Trout Lagoon and off South Head, where gun positions and installations are also blasted; fires are started in the Main Camp and hangar areas. The 344th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group, is activated at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage with P-40s.
SUNDAY, 11 OCTOBER 1942
Kiska Island is hit by 3 bombing and strafing missions flown by 10 B-24s and 3 B-17s; the B-17s make no contact; the B-24s blast harbor targets and Main Camp.
MONDAY, 12 OCTOBER 1942
2 B-24s abort bombing of Kiska Island due to overcast and instead fly shipping search W of Attu Island.
TUESDAY, 13 OCTOBER 1942
A search mission is not completed due to weather.
COGHLAN II (DD-606) arrived Kodiak. Left the Aleutians 25 August 1943.
WEDNESDAY, 14 OCTOBER 1942
9 B-24s, 6 B-26s, 1 B-17 and 12 P-38s bomb and strafe Kiska Island installations and shipping; fire bombs are dropped on hangars and the Main Camp area where a large fire is started; 2 torpedo attacks on shipping in Gertrude Cove score no hits; the P-38s destroy 3 floatplanes on water; 1 P-38 is shot down.
THURSDAY, 15 OCTOBER 1942
3 B-26s bomb and 1 B-24 flies photo reconnaissance over Kiska and Attu Islands; the B-26s hit a large cargo ship in Gertrude Cove, Kiska Island, starting a fire, and hit buildings on Attu Island; AA claims 1 B-26.
FRIDAY, 16 OCTOBER 1942
1 B-17, 6 B-26s, and 4 P-38s bomb Kiska Island and lowlevel bomb and sink 2 destroyers just N of there; duds hit a large freighter beached off Trout Lagoon; 1 B-26 is shot down.
SATURDAY, 17 OCTOBER 1942
5 B-24s bomb the Main Camp area on Kiska Island and a beached vessel in Trout Lagoon; the results are unobserved due to clouds; 1 B-24 flying weather reconnaissance finds no trace of 2 destroyers, confirming their sinking on 16 Oct.
SUNDAY, 18 OCTOBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, on Kiska Island 4 B-24s bomb Main Camp, score near misses on a beached vessel in Trout Lagoon, and hit a gasoline storage area; weather aircraft flies reconnaissance over Attu, Segula, Little Sitkin, and Gareloi Islands.
MONDAY, 19 OCTOBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, a B-17 flies weather reconnaissance and bomb runs over Attu, Semichi, Kiska, and Amchitka Islands; 6 B-24s dispatched to bomb Kiska Island abort the mission due to weather.
TUESDAY, 20 OCTOBER 1942
6 B-24s take off for Kiska Island but return due to weather; reconnaissance is flown to 70 miles (113 km) E of Attu Island; a negative search is made for a missing C-53. The detachment of the 56th Fighter Squadron, 54th Fighter Group, moves from Nome to Elmendorf Field, Alaska with P-39s (the squadron is based at Harding Field, Louisiana).
WEDNESDAY, 21 OCTOBER 1942
Weather reconnaissance aircraft returns twice due to fog.
THURSDAY, 22 OCTOBER 1942
Weather reconnaissance aircraft reports a submarine at 52-08N 177-21 W; a US Navy (US) aircraft later makes contact and drops depth bomb; the result is unknown.
The Advance Command Post, Headquarters Alaska Defense Command, was established at Fort Greely.
FRIDAY, 23 OCTOBER 1942
Armed reconnaissance by 7 bombers, escorted by 6 P-38s, is flown over Kiska Island installations, chiefly the submarine base and Main Camp; visibility is excellent and direct hits are scored, including 1 on the submarine base. A detachment of the 56th Fighter Squadron, 54th Fighter Group, based at Harding Field, Louisiana, begins operating from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage with P-39s.
SATURDAY, 24 OCTOBER 1942
3 B-17s hit the Kiska Island submarine base; results are not observed; and a weather reconnaissance flight is made over Attu Island.
TUESDAY, 27 OCTOBER 1942
6 B-24s flying an attack on the Kiska Island submarine base turn back due to weather; a weather aircraft flies reconnaissance over Gareloi, Segula, Kiska, and Attu Islands, Aleutian Islands.
WEDNESDAY, 28 OCTOBER 1942
6 B-24s turn back from an attempted attack on the Kiska Island submarine base because of adverse weather; a B-17 bombs Attu Island with unobserved results and flies weather reconnaissance over Kiska, Amchitka, and Tanaga Islands, Aleutian Islands.
401st Base Headquarters and Air Base Squadron arrived Kodiak.
THURSDAY, 29 OCTOBER 1942
The Japanese reoccupy Attu Island; a special reconnaissance flown with Lieutenant General Simon B Buckner, covers Tanaga, Amchitka, and Kiska Islands.
FRIDAY, 30 OCTOBER 1942
1 B-24 twice flies reconnaissance over Kiska and Agattu Islands; there are no bombing mission as all bombers are on alert for possible naval targets.
SATURDAY, 31 OCTOBER 1942
Weather and reconnaissance flight over Attu and Kiska Islands; over Kiska Island, the weather aircraft draws AA fire from Little Kiska Island; no other missions as all combat aircraft are alerted for a possible naval target.
November 1942
The 111th Canadian Fighter Squadron of P-40s arrived Kodiak and moved out in AUGUST 1943. (From base history)
WEDNESDAY, 4 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, bad weather at Umnak Island and Dutch Harbor on Unalaska Island and a flooded field at Adak Island preclude missions; a new Adak Island runway permits an air alert.
THURSDAY, 5 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands weather reconnaissance is flown over Kiska and Little Kiska Islands.
FRIDAY, 6 NOVEMBER 1942
A weather aircraft is forced back near Kiska Island.
SATURDAY, 7 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 6 B-24s and 2 B-26s attack the submarine base in Kiska Island Harbor, slightly damaging float fighters and a seaplane beached by storm; a B-17 flies reconnaissance over the airfield W of Holtz Bay on Attu Island, and bombs the submarine base and a previously-damaged freighter in Gertrude Cove on Kiska Island.
23rd Battalion arrives Kodiak with 980 enlisted and 27 officers. They depart 21 APRIL 1943.
SUNDAY, 8 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, there is an intermittent air alert; the weather aircraft returns due to icing.
MONDAY, 9 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 2 B-26s and 4 P-38s bomb a cargo ship in Gertrude Cove, Kiska Island; no hits; 2 P-38s then strafe the harbor area on Kiska Island; 1 B-17 and 4 P-38s attack Holtz Bay, Attu Island Island and Attu Island Airfield, destroying 8 float Zekes; 1 B-17 flies weather reconnaissance over Attu, Kiska, and Segula Islands.
TUESDAY, 10 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, reconnaissance is flown over Attu, Semichi, Segula, Alaid, and Kiska Islands; 5 B-24s and 1 B-17 bomb Kiska Island, but they cannot bomb the Kiska submarine base and return with some bombs; 2 P-38s and 1 OA-10 fly local air coverage.
WEDNESDAY, 11 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 3 B-26s, 3 B-17s, and 3 B-24s are over Kiska Island; the B-26s make unsuccessful runs on a ship in Gertrude Cove; the B-17s and B-24s find the submarine base closed by weather. A weather aircraft flies over Attu and Amchitka Islands.
THURSDAY, 12 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, bombers are on alert at Umnak and Adak Islands to attack any reported naval targets; intermittent fighter patrols fly over Adak Island. The 344th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group, based at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, sends a detachment to Cold Bay, Alaska with P-40s.
The Army Landing Field at Cape Chiniak, Alaska, was designated Marks Army Air Field.
FRIDAY, 13 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, reconnaissance over Attu and Agattu Islands reveals 5 landing barges in Chichagof harbor on Attu Island.
SATURDAY, 14 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 1 B-24 flies armed reconnaissance over Kiska and Attu Islands and bombs Holtz Bay and Chichagof on Attu Island with negative results; bombers at Adak and Umnak Islands are alerted for shipping targets.
SUNDAY, 15 NOVEMBER 1942
The 21st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy) (under control of the 28th Composite Group), ceases operating from Adak Island and returns to base on Umnak island with B-24s. The 406th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 41st Bombardment Group (Medium) (attached to 28th Composite Group), arrives at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage from the US with A-29s and B-18s (the squadron has been operating from Alaska since Jun 42).
MONDAY, 16 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, a weather reconnaissance flight is flown over Kiska and Attu Islands. On Attu Island, demolition charges are dropped on Holtz Bay, AA guns, and on a village; results are not observed.
TUESDAY, 17 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, weather a reconnaissance aircraft is forced back by weather W of Kiska Island; bombers are on alert to attack surface vessels.
WEDNESDAY, 18 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, armed reconnaissance is flown over Kiska and Attu Islands; no bombs are dropped.
THURSDAY, 19 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, reconnaissance aircraft over Attu and Agattu Islands sights 2 unidentified float monoplanes E of Buldir Island.
FRIDAY, 20 NOVEMBER 1942
A reconnaissance aircraft over Kiska Island draws heavy AA from Gertrude Cove.
Alaska Highway opens, 1,671 miles long.
SATURDAY, 21 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, reconnaissance is flown over Kiska, Attu, and Agattu Islands.
SUNDAY, 22 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, a B-24 flies reconnaissance over Kiska, Attu, and Agattu Islands; bombers and fighters are alerted for a 23 Nov mission to find and destroy a reported 5-vessel convoy.
MONDAY, 23 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, reconnaissance is flown over Kiska, Attu, Agattu, and Amchitka Islands.
TUESDAY, 24 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, 1 B-24 flies reconnaissance over Kiska Island; weather precludes the westward continuation of reconnaissance; a scheduled mission of 8 B-24s and 4 B-26s to Kiska Island is called off due to icing conditions.
WEDNESDAY, 25 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, reconnaissance is flown over Kiska, Attu and the Semichi Islands.
THURSDAY, 26 NOVEMBER 1942
In the Aleutian Islands, a B-24 reconnoitering Holtz Bay harbor on Attu Island spots shipping targets which are subsequently hit by 4 B-26s escorted by 4 P-38s; 1 large vessel is claimed afire and sinking; reconnaissance is flown over Rat Island, Kiska Island shipping, Agattu and Semichi Islands and the N coast of Attu Island; 2 P-38s and 1 B-26 sustain minor damage.
FRIDAY, 27 NOVEMBER 1942
Photo reconnaissance covers Kiska, Amchitka and Attu Islands; a ship attacked in Holtz Bay on Attu Island on the previous day is observed lower in water and still burning.
374th Port Battalion, Transportation Corps, arrived Kodiak. with 4 officers and 236 enlisted. Departed 5 May 1944.
SATURDAY, 28 NOVEMBER 1942
A B-24 photographs a beached freighter at Holtz Bay, Attu Island drawing no AA fire during 10 runs over the bay, and flies reconnaissance over Kiska Island.
37th Infantry, 2nd Battalion departed Kodiak. On 20 SEPTEMBER 1941 there were 1036 here.
SUNDAY, 29 NOVEMBER 1942
A B-24 over Holtz Bay, Attu Island reports the vessel bombed and damaged on 26 Nov as still sinking; 1 B-26 flies an uneventful reconnaissance over the S shore of Kiska Island.
MONDAY, 30 NOVEMBER 1942
A B-24 flies reconnaissance over Semichi and Attu Islands; other flights are prevented by weather.
DECEMBER 1942
Magnetic loop station in Kodiak.
TUESDAY, 1 DECEMBER 1942
B-24 flies reconnaissance over the Semichis and Attu Islands. Weather prevents any other flights.
The detachment of the 52d Fighter Squadron, 32d Fighter Group that has been operating from Seymour Island, Galapagos Islands with P-40s since 5 Jun 42 returns to France Field, Canal Zone.
The detachment of the 57th Fighter Squadron, 54th Fighter Group with P-39s that has been operating in Alaska since 20 Jun 42 returns to it base at Harding Field, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
WEDNESDAY, 2 DECEMBER 1942
A B-24 finds Semichi and Attu unchanged during a reconnaissance run; a B-26s on reconnaissance finds Kiska closed by fog.
THURSDAY, 3 DECEMBER 1942
Two bombers and several fighters fly reconnaissance over Semichis, Kiska and Attu Islands. There is a constant air alert for US forces on Adak.
FRIDAY, 4 DECEMBER 1942
Seven B-24s and nine B-26s escorted by 16 P-38s take off upon a Navy PBY report of a surface force southeast of Amchitka Island. At the interception point, the area is searched without results. The PBY pilot later report he saw "clouds." Reconnaissance is flown over Attu, Agattu, Semichi, Kiska and Amchitka Islands.
SATURDAY, 5 DECEMBER 1942
Reconnaissance missions over Attu, Agattu, the Semichis, Amchitka and Kiska turns up nothing.
Armed Forces Radio Kodiak occupies new studios and receives official license with callsign WVCQ.
SUNDAY, 6 DECEMBER 1942
Reconnaissance is flown over Attu, Agattu, Amchitka, Kiska and the Semichis Islands.
The 18th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group with P-40s transfers from Alaska to Adak Island, Aleutian Islands.
MONDAY, 7 DECEMBER 1942 (Anniversary of Pearl Harbor)
A reconnaissance mission is flown over the Semichis and Attu Islands; reconnaissance of Kiska Is is aborted due to weather.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1942
An attempted bombing mission of Attu and Kiska Islands by six B-24s and six B-26s, escorted by eight P-38s, is forced back by weather. An uneventful reconnaissance is flown by a B-24 and a B-26 over Attu, Agattu, Amchitka, Kiska and the Semichis Islands.
THURSDAY, 10 DECEMBER 42
The weather aircraft which crashlanded at Atka Island yesterday is sighted on the west end of the island, its fuselage broken off aft of the wings. The crew, later brought back, is unharmed except for light injuries to Lieutenant General William Lynd, a visiting Inspector General. An uneventful reconnaissance covers Attu, Kiska and the Semichis Islands. Four B-26s and six P-38s abort a bomb run to Kiska due to weather.
FRIDAY, 11 DECEMBER 1942
An uneventful reconnaissance covers Attu, Agattu, Amchitka, Kiska and the Semichis Islands. Three B-26s and four P-38s rebomb and strafe a previously bombed cargo vessel in Kiska Harbor, scouting two more direct hits. The P-38s also strafe and bomb Kiska Harbor submarine base and seaplane hangars, camp area and nearby gun emplacements.
SATURDAY, 12 DECEMBER 1942
An attempted photographic reconnaissance mission over Kiska Island by a B-24 and two P-38s returns without result due to weather. Another reconnaissance B-24 is turned back by a weather front west of Buldir Island. The detachment of the 42d Fighter Squadron, 54th Fighter Group, which has been operating in Alaska with P-39s since Jun 42, returns to its base at Harding Field, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
SUNDAY, 13 DECEMBER 1942
A largely negative reconnaissance is flown over Attu, Agattu, Kiska, Amchitka and the Semichis Islands by two B-24s and two P-38s.
THURSDAY, 17 DECEMBER 1942
A reconnaissance sortie is flown over Attu, Agattu, Kiska, Amchitka and the Semichis Islands. Two attacks by five B-24s, two B-25s and four B-26s--the second attack escorted by eight P-38s--take off for Kiska Island. On the first mission, four B-24s, gets through and hit the submarine base area, marine railway, buildings, and communication facilities. The second mission aborts due to weather. P-38s and B-24s also fly offshore patrol between Vega Point and Little Kiska.
USS Hulbert colides with and sinks the Kodiak mail boat.
FRIDAY, 18 DECEMBER 1942
A B-24 flies reconnaissance over Kiska, Attu, Agattu and Semichis Islands.
SATURDAY, 19 DECEMBER 1942
Two B-24s fly reconnaissance and patrol over Amchitka and Kiska Islands. Four escorting P-38s turn back due to weather and mechanical difficulties.
SUNDAY, 20 DECEMBER 1942
Four B-26s, five B-24s, five B-25s and nine P-38s make a coordinated bombing, strafing, and incendiary attack on Kiska Harbor installations and vicinity, especially on the submarine base and near the marine railway and gun emplacements. A direct hit is scored on a probable ammunition dump. P-38s also strafe a previously damaged cargo ship off Trout Lagoon. One B-24 and two P-38s fly photographic and reconnaissance patrol over Attu, Agattu, Semichis and Amchitka Islands.
MONDAY, 21 DECEMBER 1942
One B-24s flies an uneventful reconnaissance over Amchitka, Kiska, Semichis and Attu Islands. A B-24 and two P-38s abort a photographic mission due to weather. A detachment of the 56th Fighter Squadron, 54th Fighter Group, which has been operating P-39s in Alaska since 20 Jun 42, returns to its base at Harding Field, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
TUESDAY, 22 DECEMBER 1942
All missions including a B-24 weather reconnaissance weather run are cancelled due to weather.
THURSDAY, 24 DECEMBER 1942 (CHRISTMAS EVE)
The reconnaissance aircraft over Kiska finds shipping there unchanged. Weather cancel all other missions.
FRIDAY, 25 DECEMBER 1942 (CHRISTMAS DAY)
A B-24 takes photographs of Kiska and Attu Islands and unsuccessfully bombs five barges between Gertrude Cove and Kiska Harbor. The B-24 then sights eight float Zekes; three Zekes unsuccessfully attempt to attack the B-24. HQ 344th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group with P-40s transfers from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage to Ft Randall, Cold Bay.
SATURDAY, 26 DECEMBER 1942
Six B-24s and nine P-38s attack Holtz Bay but do not find the eight float Zekes seen there yesterday; the P-38s strafe Attu installations at minimum altitude. while the B-24s bomb Sarana Bay. AA fire downs on P-38 and damages another. Later, six B-25s and four P-38s over Kiska and Gertrude Cove abort due to low ceiling. An OA-10 flies reconnaissance over northeast Kiska.
SUNDAY, 27 DECEMBER 1942
Two B-24s flying reconnaissance over Kiska and Amchitka Islands abort in bad weather.
MONDAY, 28 DECEMBER 1942
Icing conditions and low visibility prevent all flying.
TUESDAY, 29 DECEMBER 1942
A B-24 flies a negative reconnaissance over Rat and Amchitka Islands. A scheduled attack on Kiska Island and the reconnaissance mission over Amchitka Island are cancelled by bad weather.
USS Wasmuth (DMS-15) was sunk by explosion of depth charges during gale off Aleutian Islands.
WEDNESDAY, 30 DECEMBER 1942
B-25s and 14 P-38s approach Kiska Harbor at minimum altitude for a bombing and strafing attack. Two ships and three submarines, newly arrived, are covered by Zekes. Four of the Zekes engage the approaching P-38s in a dogfight; two P-38s are shot down and four Zekes are listed as probables. The B-25s meanwhile attack the ships with unobserved results; one B-25 is shot down off Little Kiska. A Navy PBY picks up survivors, but fails to return to base. Kiska Harbor is then attacked once more by five B-24s, four B-25s and four B-26s. They claim hits on both vessels observing explosions on the smaller ship. A B-24 photographs Amchitka while a weather reconnaissance of Near Island is cancelled due to weather. Aerial reconnaissance observes for the first time Japanese use of a smoke screen at Kiska Harbor.
THURSDAY, 31 DECEMBER 1942 (NEW YEAR'S EVE)
Six B-24s covered by nine P-38s, attack Kiska Harbor, hitting two cargo vessels; one of six intercepting Japanese aircraft is probably shot down. A B-25 searching for the Navy PBY missing since yesterday also flies reconnaissance over Semisopochnoi, Segula, Little Sitkin, Gareloi and Amchitka.
Post strength at Kodiak: 420 officers, 5779 enlisted men.
JANUARY 1943
Admirals Nimitz and King replaced Theobald with Rear Admiral Thomas C. Kinkaid who moved his headquarters to Adak and developed a close relationship with General Buckner.
FRIDAY, 1 JANUARY 1943
Salvage vessel USS Rescuer (ARS-18) lost by grounding in the Aleutian Islands.
SATURDAY, 2 JANUARY 1943
Three B-25s, three B-26s and eight P-38s heading for Kiska are forced back by bad weather. The weather aircraft cannot see into Kiska Harbor or Gertrude Cove. Two B-24s fly photographic reconnaissance over Amchitka and encounter poor weather. An OA-10 unsuccessfully searches the islands east of Segula for a missing OA-10.
MONDAY, 4 JANUARY 1943
Six B-24s, three B-25s, three B-26s and ten P-40s en route to Kiska, are forced back near Segula by snow squalls and low ceiling. The weather aircraft flies unsuccessful reconnaissance over Kiska and photographic reconnaissance is flown over Amchitka. An OA-10 investigates flares reported near Kagalaska Strait.
TUESDAY, 5 JANUARY 1943
Three B-25s sink a 6,500-ton cargo vessel previously sighted by a PBY off Holtz Bay, where a weather and armed reconnaissance B-24 with a direct bomb hits and sinks another freighter shortly afterwards. A B-24 flies photographic reconnaissance over Amchitka, concentrating on Constantine Harbor. A Kiska attack mission of six heavy bombers, six medium bombers and 12 fighters is cancelled due to weather.
WEDNESDAY, 6 JANUARY 1943
Reconnaissance is flown over Amchitka, the Semichis, Agattu and Attu. Flotsam sighted outside of Holtz Bay confirms that the freighter bombed yesterday sank. Six B-24s, six B-25s and 12 P-38s take off to attack Kiska; the P-38s and one B-24 turn back due to weather. The B-25s find the target obscured and five Zekes waiting to intercept them, whereupon they turn back without attacking. The five remaining B-24s circle Kiska without contacting enemy aircraft; one of the B-24s, exploiting a break in the cloud cover, bombs the Kiska submarine base area which the others then bomb through the clouds.
THURSDAY, 7 JANUARY 1943
Six B-25s and 12 P-38s dispatched to Kiska turn back due to cloud cover. Six B-24s circle over Kiska for two hours until four can bomb the submarine base. AA fire damages three of the attackers. Photographs taken reveal use of smoke pots by the defenders and also suggest construction of a fighter strip along the ridge south of Salmon Lagoon. Negative reconnaissance is flown over Amchitka, Kiska, Agattu and Attu.
FRIDAY, 8 JANUARY 1943
A B-24 flies photographic reconnaissance over Amchitka. Another B-24 aborts a weather run over Kiska because of instrument trouble.
SATURDAY, 9 JANUARY 1943
50+ knot winds at Adak ground all missions.
TUESDAY, 12 JANUARY 1942
Two B-24s cover a small US Army and Navy force landing unopposed at Amchitka. Two B-25s and four P-38 escorts also on the cover mission turn back due to weather. Weather reconnaissance is flown over Attu, Agatuu, Semichis and, lastly, over Kiska Harbor, where four ships are observed.
Destroyer USS Worden (DD-352) was wrecked off Amchitka.
PT-28 was damaged beyond repair in a storm at Dora Harbor, Unimak Is.
WEDNESDAY, 13 JANUARY 1943
Three bombers and four fighters are in the air. The weather reconnaissance aircraft returns west of Kiska due to high winds. Constantine Harbor is patrolled until weather forces aircraft to return. An attack on Kiska is cancelled.
THURSDAY, 14 JANUARY 1943
38th Battalion arrived Kodiak with 984 enlisted and 27 officers. They departed 6 Aug. 1943.
43rd Battalion arrived Kodiak with 942 enlisted and 26 officers. They departed 23 Feb. 1943.
FRIDAY, 15 JANUARY 1943
A total of eight P-38s, three B-25s and a B-24 patrol Constantine Harbor, fly reconnaissance over Kiska, where one ship is sighted, and fly negative armored reconnaissance runs over Attu, the Semichis and Buldir.
4th N.C.Reg. arrived Kodiak 15 Jan. 1943 with 89 enlisted and 8 officers. They departed 25 Sept. 1943
Fire destroyed the headquarters building of the 691st Signal Aircraft Warning Reporting Company, Special Second Reporting Platoon, at Lazy Bay.
SATURDAY, 16 JANUARY 1943
Six B-24s off to hit Kiska return due to weather. A B-24 flies negative reconnaissance over Buldir, the Semichis, Attu and Agattu.
MONDAY, 18 JANUARY 1943
A B-24 on reconnaissance reports two vessels in Kiska Harbor. Thereupon four B-24s, four B-26s, one B-25 and six P-38s fly out of Adak. Mechanical trouble forces two B-26s to return. The bomb run is negative. Meanwhile bad weather closes in on Kiska and Adak. Six aircraft are lost; one B-24 lands in a 20 mph downwind and crashes into two P-38s while three other B-24s are missing on the return flight.
TUESDAY, 19 JANUARY 1943
The crew of one of the three B-24s missing yesterday, which had crashlanded at Great Sitkin Island, is picked up by a Navy tender. Weather prevents missions and searches.
18th Engineers, veterans of the ALCAN road project, arrived Kodiak. on USAT DAVID W. BRANCH. They departed Kodiak 18 March 1943.
Kodiak post strength, January 1943: 449 officers, 7130 enlisted men.
WEDNESDAY, 20 JANUARY 1943
The weather aircraft aborts shortly after takeoff. A B-24 and a Navy PBY search without results for the two B-24s missing since Monday.
THURSDAY, 21 JANUARY 1943
A weather reconnaissance aircraft flies. An attack run over Kiska and a patrol over Amchitka are call off due to weather. Air searches for the two B-24s missing since Monday continue.
FRIDAY, 22 JANUARY 1943
The weather reconnaissance aircraft finds Kiska closed in and flies a negative search for the two B-24s missing since Monday. For the first time the weather aircraft draws AA fire through the overcast at Kiska, suggesting that the Japanese have fire-control radar.
SATURDAY, 23 JANUARY 1943
Weather reconnaissance over Kiska and a search mission for the two B-24s missing since Monday reveal nothing. Enemy aircraft appear over Amchitka twice but inflict no damage. During the period of 18 to 23 Jan, a period of continuous storms and sudden changes to extreme foul weather, non-combat losses are exceptionally high as 13 aircraft are lost; no losses result from enemy action.
MONDAY, 24 JANUARY 1943
Six heavy bombers and six medium bombers attempt an attack on Kiska Island. The medium bombers abort over Semisopochnoi. The heavy bombers circle Kiska until the weather closes in. Two Japanese aircraft bomb the Amchitka harbor area before US interceptors, six P-38s, and one B-24 arrive. Two P-38s return due to mechanical troubles; the others fly a negative search over Kiska.
MONDAY, 25 JANUARY 1943
P-38s are dispatched too late to engage two floatplanes bombing Amchitka. Reconnaissance is flown over Kiska, Buldir, Semichis, Attu and Agattu. One B-24 and two P-38s fly two patrol missions over Amchitka. An attack mission to Kiska is turned back by weather. B-25s unsuccessfully search for missing aircraft.
TUESDAY, 26 JANUARY 1943
All missions are cancelled due to weather. Two Japanese aircraft strafe Constantine Harbor, Amchitka Island.
WEDNESDAY, 27 JANUARY 1943 (
A negative weather reconnaissance sortie is flown over Kiska Island. Four P-38s fly protective patrol over Amchitka Island. Upon their departure, three Japanese aircraft appear and unsuccessfully bomb shipping but cause three casualties.
THURSDAY, 28 JANUARY 1943
A weather aircraft encounters poor visibility over Kiska Island. Two patrols fly over Amchitka. The second runs into poor weather and aborts. An attack on Kiska is cancelled due to weather.
45th Battalion arrived Kodiak with 1035 enlisted and 27 officers. They departed Kodiak 31 Aug. 1943.
41st Battalion arrived Kodiak with 1014 enlisted and 27 officers. They departed 3 Mar. 1944.
FRIDAY, 29 JANUARY 1943
Weather reconnaissance over Kiska and a patrol over Rat Island, flown by one B-24, two B-25s and four P-38s, are recalled early due to weather. All other missions are cancelled.
SATURDAY, 30 JANUARY 1943
Two patrols, each composed of one B-25 and four P-38s, fly over Amchitka Island and are recalled early due to weather. One B-17, upon an alleged submarine sighting, drops four depth charges and one bomb whereupon a whale breaks water. Weather cancels other missions.
MONDAY, 31 JANUARY 1943
A weather and photographic reconnaissance aircraft flies twice over Kiska Island. During the first mission near Attu Island, the aircraft is jumped by 6 fighters which it eludes. Four B-17s, 2 B-24s, 6 B-25s, 4 P-38s and 4 P-40s then attempt an attack on Kiska; P-40s turn back with mechanical troubles; the other aircraft find Kiska closed in and abort the mission. Two patrol missions, each by 1 B-25 and 4 P-38s, fly over Amchitka Island; two enemy floatplanes bomb Constantine Harbor on Amchitka without results.
FEBRUARY 1943
The Fort Greely Ski Chalet, constructed in the pass overlooking Anton Larsen and Chiniak bays, 6 miles northwest of the main garrison, was officially opened and a winter sports carnival was held.
MONDAY 1 FEBRUARY 1943
All missions are cancelled due to weather. Enemy aircraft bomb and strafe Amchitka harbor and shipping without inflicting damage.
THURSDAY, 4 FEBRUARY 1943 (
The weather reconnaissance aircraft over Kiska, jumped by 3 fighters, shoots 1 down. It is followed by 3 B-17s, 3 B-24s, 3 B-25s, 4 P-38s and 8 P-40s. The B-24s blast the North Head submarine base, and score near misses on a cargo ship. The B-25s hit the vicinity of the Main Camp area; 3 of 5 floatplanes which intercept are shot down. The P-40s strafe Kiska ground installations and sight a fighter strip southwest of Salmon Lagoon. Two Amchitka fighter patrols are flown; the first also strafes gun emplacements on Vega Point. Five enemy bombers strike Amchitka.
A total eclipse of the sun was observed from Kodiak.
SATURDAY, 6 FEBRUARY 1943
A weather reconnaissance is flown over Kiska and Attu Islands.
SUNDAY, 7 FEBRUARY 1943
1 B-17 flies weather reconnaissance over Kiska.
MONDAY, 8 FEBRUARY 1943
Weather reconnaissance is flown over Kiska, Agattu, and Attu Islands. Five B-24s and 5 B-25s bomb the Kiska Camp area and hit a water tank and buildings. Two B-25s bomb North Head through the overcast. Four P-38s and a B-25 patrol over Amchitka Island.
WEDNESDAY, 10 FEBRUARY 1943
The weather reconnaissance aircraft aborts the mission due to radio failure. Four B-24s, 2 B-17s, 8 B-25s and 8 P-38s attack Kiska Island; hits are observed on the landing strip and near the hangar and buildings. Two patrol missions, each by 4 P-38s and 1 B-25, are flown over the American-held Amchitka Island.
FRIDAY, 12 FEBRUARY 1943
Weather reconnaissance and attack missions against Kiska Island and a fighter patrol over Amchitka Island are broken off due to weather.
SATURDAY, 13 FEBRUARY 1943
Weather reconnaissance is flown over Kiska, Attu, Agattu, the Semichis, and Buldir Island. Five heavy bombers, 6 medium bombers and 10 P-38s bomb and strafe Kiska targets including the Camp area, landing strip, and shipping. Of 5 float-type fighter which attack, P-38s shoot down 3. Four P-38s and 1 B-25 fly a patrol mission over Amchitka Island and Little Kiska; a B-25 shoots down a floatplane.
MONDAY, 15 FEBRUARY 1943
A weather reconnaissance B-24 is soon called off due to weather. All other missions are cancelled. Six float-type Japanese aircraft bomb and strafe Allied held Amchitka Island, hitting the runway and causing casualties. The 18th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group with P-40s transfers from Adak Island to Amchitka Island.
TUESDAY, 16 FEBRUARY 1943
Weather reconnaissance aircraft flies over Kiska, Attu, Agattu, the Semicis and Buldir Islands. Five B-24s, 6 B-25s, 6 P-38s and 1 B-25 photographic aircraft take off for Kiska but do not attack due to weather. One P-40, accompanying several P-38s on the Amchitka Island fighter patrol, lands on Amchitka strip; an afternoon patrol of 7 P-40s and 1 transport also land at the strip which is now safe for limited operations.
WEDNESDAY, 17 FEBRUARY 1943
Weather cancels all missions and also the laying of mat at the Amchitka Island airstrip.
THURSDAY, 18 FEBRUARY 1943
A weather reconnaissance determines that 3 ships at Attu Island to be friendly. P-40s on local patrol over Amchitka Island encounter and shoot down 2 enemy fighters.
The 21st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy) operating under control of the 28th Composite Group with B-24s from Umnak Islands begins operating from Amchitka Island.
FRIDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 1943
Weather cancels all missions except limited weather reconnaissance.
SATURDAY, 20 FEBRUARY 1943
Reconnaissance over Kiska Island finds weather favorable and 5 B-24s, 7 B-25s and 8 P-38s take off to attack. The fighters hit the Main Camp area; the bombers bomb North Head, the Main Camp area and the runway.
The 11th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group with P-40s transfers from Fort Glenn on Umnak Island to Adak Island.
SUNDAY, 21 FEBRUARY 1943
Weather prevents all flying from Adak Island. Fighters based on Amchitka Island patrol Kiska.
MONDAY, 22 FEBRUARY 1943
16 bombers and 8 fighters abort a mission against Kiska Island due to weather.
YP-72 wasdestroyed by grounding at Adak.
TUESDAY, 23 FEBRUARY 1943
17 bombers and 8 fighters bomb the Main Camp area on Kiska Island while an F-5A flies a photographic mission.
43rd Battalion departed Kodiak with 942 enlisted and 26 officers. They had arrived 14 Jan. 1943.
WEDNESDAY, 24 FEBRUARY 1943
All except one mission of 4 P-40s, to Kiska Island, are called off. The P-40s make no contacts, however.
THURSDAY, 25 FEBRUARY 1943
4 P-40s sweep Kiska Island. Six B-24s and 5 B-25s bomb the Main Camp and North Head areas of Kiska.
SATURDAY, 27 FEBRUARY 1943
6 B-24s, 6 B-25s and 4 P-38s bomb and strafe the Main Camp area on Kiska Island. On the return trip, a weather aircraft flies reconnaissance and makes a bombing and strafing run on Attu Island and nearby barges with negative results.
SUNDAY, 28 FEBRUARY 1943
Reconnaissance is flown over Kiska, Buldir, Semichis, Attu, and Agattu, with negative results. Six B-24s and 6 B-25s bomb the Main Camp area on Kiska Island.
MONDAY, 1 MARCH 1943
P-40s jettison their bombs when bad weather prevents a sweep over Kiska Island.
WEDNESDAY, 3 MARCH 1943
No. 14 Squadron (Canadian) was based at Umnak in the Aleutians
4 P-40s sweep Kiska Island dropping demolition and fragmentation bombs.
Admiral Thomas C. Kincaid, Commanding Officer of the Alaska Defense Command, tables the Kiska Island invasion plan and substitutes an Attu Island invasion plan.
THURSDAY, 4 MARCH 1943
4 P-40s fly over Kiska Island but drop no bombs due to weather.
FRIDAY, 5 MARCH 1943
1 B-24 flies negative weather reconnaissance over Kiska, Semichis, Attu, Agattu and Buldir Islands.
SATURDAY, 6 MARCH 1943
1 B-24 flies uneventful reconnaissance over Kiska. Attu, Agattu, Buldir, and the Semichis Islands.
SUNDAY, 7 MARCH 1943
The first flight of B-25s is brought up to Amchitka Island. This enables stepped-up raids on Kiska. Nine B-24s and 4 P-38s bomb and strafe the Chichagof Harbor area and Holtz Bay installations on Kiska. A fighter sweep, 6 B-24s, and 10 B-25s hit North Head and the Main Camp area on Kiska.
HQ 343d Fighter Group transfers from Elmendorf Field, Alaska to Adak, Aleutian Islands.
MONDAY, 8 MARCH 1943
The 344th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group with P-40's transfers from Ft. Randall, Alaska to Ft. Glenn, Alaska.
TUESDAY, 9 MARCH 1943
6 B-24s, 10 B-25s, 12 P-38s and 4 P-40s attack Kiska Island. The P-40s and 6 of the B-25s return to base due to bad weather; the other bombers bomb the Main Camp area, North Head and the submarine base.
WEDNESDAY, 10 MARCH 1943
A reconnaissance airplane is attacked by 5 enemy aircraft. The Kiska attack mission is flown by 10 B-25s, 6 B-24s, 12 P-38s (4 of them flying top cover), and 1 F-5A. Eight of the P-38s strafe ground installations; the B-25s bomb a radar site and pound North Head, silencing AA fire; the B-24s hit the Main Camp area. Four Amchitka-based P-40s bomb the submarine base.
FRIDAY, 12 MARCH 1943
12 Amchitka-based P-40s scout Kiska Island.
The 54th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group with P-38's transfers from Adak Island to Amchitka Island.
SATURDAY, 13 MARCH 1943
A B-24 on reconnaissance returns early because of adverse weather. Twelve P-40s strike the Kiska Island beach, camp and runway. Hits are observed on these targets and among 14 parked airplanes. Eight P-38s with 8 P-40s flying top cover again take off for Kiska. Only 3 of the P-38s reach the target and strafe aircraft on the beach. Another sights a submarine SW of Rat Island.
SUNDAY, 14 MARCH 1943
HQ 28th Composite Group transfers from Elmendorf Field, Alaska to Adak Island.
MONDAY, 15 MARCH 1943
6 B-25s, with 4 P-38s flying top cover, bomb North Head on Kiska Island, hitting the Main Camp and gun emplacements. Six B-24s with 4 P-38s for top cover then bomb Main Camp. Revetments and the hangar area are strafed by the P-38s one of which is lost to AA. Next, 5 B-24s and 16 P-38s bomb and strafe the Main Camp area and North Head. Four P-40s then unsuccessfully search for 3 enemy fighters which had earlier attacked a weather plane. Main Camp is hit two more times, by 3 B-25s and by 8 P-38s.
TUESDAY, 16 MARCH 1943
16 B-25s, 13 B-24s, 8 P-40s and 32 P-38s (cover/escort) sorties are flown to Kiska Island in one weather reconnaissance and 2 attack missions from Adak Island, and in 3 more missions from Amchitka Island. Targets hit are North Head, the Main Camp area, radar sites, and the submarine base. On the last Amchitka mission 1 enemy floatplane is shot down and 2 more are probables. Four heavy bombers are hit and 1 B-25 does not return.
WEDNESDAY, 17 MARCH 1943 (ST. PATRICK'S DAY)
8 P-38s patrol Kiska Island without making contacts.
THURSDAY, 18 MARCH 1943
Taking off from Adak Island, 6 B-24's bomb the Main Camp area, 6 B-25's bomb North Head, and 12 P-38's fly top cover and strafing attacks. Twelve Amchitka-based P-38's then blast the Kiska runway and Main Camp area, starting fires. At Amchitka, the 54th Fighter Squadron is reinforced by several F-5A's.
18th Engineers departed Kodiak, veterans of the ALCAN road project. They had arrived 19 January 1943.
FRIDAY, 19 MARCH 1943
All missions are cancelled due to weather except local fighter patrols. HQ XI Bomber Command is activated on Adak Island.
SUNDAY, 21 MARCH 1943
13 B-24's, 9 B-25's, 50 P-38's, 16 P-4O's, and 2 F-5A's fly 8 bombing and strafing missions to Kiska Island. Some of the missions abort due to weather. The others hit the Main Camp area, while 2 P-40's make no contact when trying to intercept reported enemy aircraft.
MONDAY, 22 MARCH 1943
6 B-25's, 12 B-24's and 22 P-38's attempt 3 missions to Kiska Island. Only 8 of the P-40's get through but fly uneventful patrol. The 404th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 28th Composite Group with B-24's transfers from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, Alaska to Adak Island.
TUESDAY, 23 MARCH 1943 (
Weather grounds all missions except the weather reconnaissance flight and an unsuccessful intercept attempt of an enemy reconnaissance airplane by 2 P-40's.
WEDNESDAY, 24 MARCH 1943
10 B-24's, 3 B-25's, and 12 P-38's fly 5 attack missions to Kiska Island. North Head runway and the Main Camp area are bombed.
THURSDAY, 25 MARCH 1943
A weather airplane take photos of Holtz Bay and Chichapof Harbor. Fourteen B-24's, 3 B-25's, 12 P-38's, and 2 P-40's fly 4 missions to Kiska Island. The targets include the beach, runway, hangar area, North Head, the Main Camp and submarine base.
FRIDAY, 26 MARCH 1943
A reconnaissance aircraft covers Attu, Agattu, Semichi and Alaid where a cabin is strafed. Upon report of Navy contacts with enemy surface force (Battle of the Komandorskie Islands, about 180 miles west of Attu), 13 B-24s, 11 B-25's and 8 P-38s are ordered to hit the enemy, reported 150 mi (240 km) west of Cape Wrangell (Attu). Because of mechanical failures and weather, airplanes cannot take off until 6 hours after the surface force is sighted. Thus, Japanese ships have fled when aircraft arrive at the interception point. Some of the returning B-25s bomb a radar site, hangar, and Main Camp area on Kiska.
The Battle of the Komandorskie Islands: American forces of two cruisers and four destroyers, under Rear Admiral Charles H. McMorris, intercepted Admiral Hosogaya's squadron, comprised of four cruisers and five destroyers. Those ships escorted three transports carrying reinforcements and supplies from Paramushiro to Attu. Over the next three-and-a-half hours the Japanese and the Americans traded more than five thousand rounds of gunfire at ranges of eight to twelve miles. Hits were scored by both sides but, amazingly, no ships were sunk. Both commanders called for air support during the engagement, but neither Japanese nor American aircraft were able to reach the scene of battle.
SATURDAY, 27 MARCH 1943
7 B-24s from Adak and 6 Amchitka-based B-25's attempt unsuccessfully to attack naval targets. From Amchitka, 1 B-25 and 6 P-38s (of which 1 turns back with mechanical trouble) provide cover for US surface force until 1300 hours local. Six P-38's and 1 B-l7 depart Adak for a second cover mission, but do not find the surface force. A detachment of the 11th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group based on Adak with P-40s begins operating from Amchitka Island.
MONDAY, 29 MARCH 1943
7 heavy and medium bombers, with fighter escort, bomb and strafe the Kiska runway and nearby Main Camp area. Heavy AA fire damages 6 bombers and 2 P-38's.
40th Coast Artillery, Battery A departed Kodiak.
TUESDAY, 30 MARCH 1943
6 missions are dispatched against Kiska and Attu Islands. From Adak, 6 B-24's, 6 B-25's, and 4 P-38's are over Kiska at 1200 hours local but cannot bomb due to weather. Four B-24's, 4 P-38's, and 2 F-5A's then bomb the runway at Attu. Next, 5 B-24's and 4 P-38's bomb the Main Camp; intense AA fire downs 1 B-24. From Amchitka, 4 P-38's bomb Little Kiska. Next, 4 P-38's bomb Kiska through the overcast, followed by 6 B-25's bombing and strafing radar, radio installations, Main Camp, runway, and personnel.
WEDNESDAY, 31 MARCH 1943
A reconnaissance airplane finds impenetrable weather and returns to base. Two P-38's make an uneventful sweep.
APRIL 1943
Cape Greville, Kodiak, radio commissioned.
THURSDAY, 1 APRIL 1943
A joint directive by Commander-in-Chief, Pacific and Commanding General Western Defense Command orders preparations for Operation LANDGRAB, the invasion of Attu Island.
16 B-24, 5 B-25, and 12 P-38 sorties are flown against Kiska Island from Adak and Amchitka Islands. Targets include a ship in Gertrude Cove, the North Head area, the Main Camp and the beach. AA fire damages 2 bombers. Reconnaissance covers Kiska, Attu, Buldir, and Semichis Islands.
During APRIL, the 73d Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 28th Composite Group with B-25's transfers from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, Alaska to Umnak Island.
All naval construction in Alaska taken over by SeaBees.
Cold Bay and Sand Point designated naval auxiliary air facility.
FRIDAY, 2 APRIL 1943
18 B-24's bomb Kiska targets including North Head. Six B-25's, 16 P-38's, and 24 P-40's in 6 missions from Amchitka to Kiska, bomb the Main Camp and submarine base areas. Four B-24's bomb the runway at Attu. All aircraft, including 2 B-25's colliding in the air, return safely.
MONDAY, 5 APRIL 1943
Reconnaissance covers all islands W of Kiska with negative results. 16 B-24's and 6 B-25's bomb the Attu runway and Kiska's Main Camp and runway. 4 P-38's fly top cover. Later, 3 B-25's, 16 P-4O's, and 16 P-38's bomb Kiska again.
WEDNESDAY, 7 APRIL 1943
The reconnaissance airplane aborts shortly after takeoff due to weather.
THURSDAY, 8 APRIL 1943
The weather airplane scouts Kiska and islands W of it with negative results.
FRIDAY, 9 APRIL 1943
A B-24 flies reconnaissance over Kiska, Attu and the Semichis. P-40's fly reconnaissance over Kiska.
SATURDAY, 10 APRIL 1943
The weather reconnaissance B-24 observes 4 unidentified aircraft near Segula. Three B-25's, 17 P-40's, and 6 P-38's fly 5 attack missions to Kiska, and negative searches for the unidentified airplanes at Segula. The last mission finds Kiska closed in and returns with bombs.
Major General Charles H. Corlett assumed command of the Kodiak post.
SUNDAY, 11 APRIL 1943
4 B-25's, 22 P-40's, and 8 P-38's hit Kiska 5 times. The last mission aborts due to weather. The other 4 missions bomb various targets starting large fires. Some fighters strafe Little Kiska.
MONDAY, 12 APRIL 1943
3 B-25's, 24 P-40's, and 13 P-38's fly 7 missions to Kiska. The fighters also strafe Little Kiska. AA fire damages 1 P-40 and 1 P-38. The P-38 force-lands safely.
12th Battalion departs Kodiak with 965 enlisted, 27 officers. They arrived Kodiak 14 SEPTEMBER 1942.
TUESDAY, 13 APRIL 1943
15 B-24's, 15 B-25's, 28 P-38's and 20 P-40's fly 11 attacks to Kiska; 43 tons of bombs are dropped on the Main Camp, North Head, and runway. Fighters attack the Main Camp causing large fires, and also strafe aircraft on the beach. Heavy AA fire damages 2 P-38's, 1 of which later crashes into the sea, and 1 B-25.
WEDNESDAY, 14 APRIL 1943
30 P-40's, 17 P-38's, 9 B-24's and 6 B-25's fly 10 missions to Kiska, bombing and strafing the runway, North Head area, installations, parked seaplanes, and facilities on Little Kiska.
THURSDAY, 15 APRIL 1943
Reconnaissance over Kiska, Attu, Semichis, and Agattu spots no new enemy activities. Two bomber missions from Adak and 11 fighter missions from Amchitka, composed of 23 B-24's, 20 B-25's, 25 P-38's, and 44 P-40's, hit Kiska; 1 F-5A takes photos; 85 tons of bombs are dropped. Fires result on North Head and Little Kiska. One B-24 is shot down in flames and 4 bombers receive battle damage.
FRIDAY, 16 APRIL 1943
Kiska is bombed and strafed 13 times. A total of 13 B-24's, 12 B-25's, 32 P-40's, 29 P-38's, and 2 F-5A's cover targets which include installations in the Holtz Bay area and gun positions on North Head.
SATURDAY, 17 APRIL 1943
17 APRIL to 15 May No. 14 Squadron (Canadian) on Amchitka.
7 B-24's bomb and score 8 direct hits on the runway and gun emplacements at Attu. One B-24 and 2 F-5A's abort due to weather. 4 B-25's, 31 P-38's, and 14 P-40's hit Kiska 9 times, bombing installations and strafing gun emplacements and 3 parked airplanes.
SUNDAY, 18 APRIL 1943
22 P-38's (some flown by Royal Canadian Air Force pilots) and 37 P-40's hit Kiska 9 times. The submarine base and gun emplacements on North Head are bombed and gun emplacements near the submarine base are silenced.
MONDAY, 19 APRIL 1943
9 missions involving 14 B-24's, 12 B-25's, 32 P-40's, and 23 P-38's are flown to Kiska. The first mission is weathered out of the primary target, Attu, and directed to Kiska. Bombing and strafing concentrates on 4 grounded ships and the submarine base area where fires are started. One ship, believed to serve as a power station, is set afire.
TUESDAY, 20 APRIL 1943
10 bombing and strafing missions by 15 B-24's, 16 B-25's, 10 P-38's, and 32 P-40's hit shipping in the harbor at Kiska and gun positions in North Head. Other targets include buildings in the Main Camp area and the runway.
WEDNESDAY, 21 APRIL 1943
Commander North Pacific Forces (NORPACFOR) places all Army and Navy Air Forces [Task Group (TG) 16.1] under Brigadier General William O. Butler, Commanding General Eleventh Air Force. The Army Air Striking Unit (Eleventh Air Force) is designated Task Unit 16.1.1 (TU 16.1.1) and the Naval Air Search Unit (Patrol Wing Four) is designated TU l6.l.2.
Two P-38's take off for Kiska but abort the mission.
23rd Battalion departs Kodiak with 980 enlisted and 27 officers. They arrived 7 Nov 42.
SATURDAY, 24 APRIL 1943
2 P-38's bomb Kiska and strafe personnel near Mutton Cove. Weather cancels other missions.
SUNDAY, 25 APRIL 1943
15 B-24's, 12 B-25's, 32 P-40's, 23 P-38's, and 1 F-5A fly 12 missions to Kiska and Attu. Targets include Holtz Bay, North Head, South Head, the beach areas, the runway, shipping, and the submarine base.
TUESDAY, 27 APRIL 1943
1 B-25 unsuccessfully investigates a reported submarine 4 mi (6.4 km) W of Bay Island. Four P-38's bomb the Main Camp, then scout Buldir.
Three subposts of Fort Greely were named: Long Island, Fort Tidball; Chiniak, Fort J. H. Smith; Miller Point, Fort Abercrombie.
FRIDAY, 30 APRIL 1943
4 B-25's, 17 P-38's, and 7 P-40's fly 4 missions to Kiska. Only the P-38's get through and blast Gertrude Cove, Main Camp, the submarine base and a ship.
Major General Charles H. Corlett departed Kodiak.
MAY 1943
Chernabura radio commissioned.
SATURDAY, 1 MAY 1943
16 attack missions on Kiska and Attu are flown by 16 B-24's, 15 B-25's, 35 P-38's, 38 P-40's, and 4 F-5A's. Kiska targets include the Main Camp, hangar, submarine base (where a fire is started), runway, radar, ship, North Head, AA guns and Gertrude Cove. Attu targets include E Attu, Holtz Bay and Chichagof Harbor installations.
SUNDAY, 2 MAY 1943
6 B-25's, 8 P-40's, and 8 P-38's fly bombing, photographic and attack missions to Kiska. Targets include North Head, South Head and buildings and AA gun batteries on Gertrude Cove.
MONDAY, 3 MAY 1943
7 B-24's, 11 B-25's, 20 P-38's, 27 P-40's and 2 F-5A's participate in a weather reconnaissance mission to Attu and in 9 attack missions to Kiska. Kiska targets include the Main Camp, North Head, radar, and runway.
TUESDAY, 4 MAY 1943
5 B-24's, 6 B-25's, 8 P-38's, 2 P-40's and 2 F-5A's take off on 2 Kiska and Attu missions. Missions to Kiska abort due to weather. At Attu targets include Chichagof Harbor, AA positions at Holtz Bay, and a floatplane. The 36th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 28th Composite Group with B-24's transfers from Fort Greeley on Kodiak Island to Amchitka Island.
WEDNESDAY, 5 MAY 1943
The weather reconnaissance airplane over Attu observes a floatplane burning on the water. Fourteen B-24's, 17 B-25's, 16 P-38's, 32 P-40's, and 5 F-5A's fly 4 attack missions to Attu and 6 [partly with Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) pilots] to Kiska. Bombs are dropped on Attu installations and fighters strafe and set afire 1 seaplane and silence AA guns. Targets include Main Camp, a radar site, North and South Head, runway, and Gertrude Cove installations.
THURSDAY, 6 MAY 1943
B-24's, B-25's and P-38's drop over 52 tons (47.2 tonnes) on Attu targets including Holtz Bay, Sarana Bay, and the Chichagof Harbor area and nearby gun positions. Kiska is also hit. Targets include radar gun positions and the Gertrude Cove and Main Camp areas. Returning P-38's also bomb and strafe a hut on Rat Island. P-40's blast Kiska and Little Kiska.
FRIDAY, 7 MAY 1943
An attempted mission to Kiska by 6 P-40's is aborted due to weather.
MONDAY, 10 MAY 1943
79th Battalion arrived Kodiak 10 May 1943 with 1080 enlisted and 27 officers. They departed 4 Oct. 1944.
TUESDAY, 11 MAY 1943
The following missions are flown to support US forces landing on Attu: 1 air-ground liaison sortie by 1 B-24; a B-24 supply sortie dropping supplies to ground forces; and 5 attack missions, flown by 11 B-24's and 12 B-25's. The first attack mission cannot find the target and instrument-bombs targets which include the runway, radar, submarine base, and camp area. Because of poor visibility the next 2 missions hit Kiska, where the runway and Main Camp are attacked. Two B-24's then bomb the Chichagof Harbor area through fog while another drops leaflets on Attu.
WEDNESDAY, 12 MAY 1943
A P-39 reconnaissance sortie over Kiska and Rat Island encounters poor weather and turns back. At Attu, an air-ground liaison B-24 watches US forces land on beach "Red" while another B-24 drops supplies. Seven attack missions flown by 10 B-24's, 12 B-25's, and 24 P-38's bomb and strafe assigned Attu targets. Four barges are set afire in the W arm of Holtz Bay.
THURSDAY, 13 MAY 1943
bad weather keeps the air-ground liaison B-24 from observing or hearing friendly ground forces on Attu and it returns to base. An air-ground support mission of 6 B-24's divert from Attu to Kiska; 2 of the bombers don't get the message, proceed to Attu, and bomb Chichagof Harbor and Holtz Bay. The other 4 bomb the Main Camp area. Eight P-40's dispatched to Kiska in 2 waves cannot see the target and instead bomb Little Kiska installations.
FRIDAY, 14 MAY 1943
Poor weather curtails bombings. The air-ground liaison B-24 flies reconnaissance and photo reconnaissance over Attu throughout the day. One B-24 carrying supplies for the ground forces hits a mountain side 10 miles (16 km) W of the drop zone. Six B-24 s and 5 B-25's fly ground support bombing missions over Attu. Two P-40's bomb Kiska through the overcast.
SATURDAY, 15 MAY 1943
17 APRIL to 15 May No. 14 Squadron (Canadian) Amchitka
Weather again curtails operations. The air-ground liaison B-24 observes and directs air operations at Attu throughout the day as visibility permits and directs a supply drop for ground forces by another B-24 in 2 air-ground support missions. Six B-24's bomb Holtz Bay and Chichagof Harbor and 6 P-38's strafe AA installations in the Holtz Bay area.
SUNDAY, 16 MAY 1943
The air-ground liaison B-24 bombs Chichagof Harbor with unobserved results. Another B-24 drops supplies to ground forces on Attu. 8 B-24's, 12 B-25's, and 12 P-38's fly ground support missions to Attu; because of weather, only the P-38's get through and strafe AA guns, installations and barges, scoring several hits. The bombers are directed to bomb Kiska. 2 P-40's fly reconnaissance mission over Kiska.
MONDAY, 17 MAY 1943
2 attempted ground support missions to Attu by a B-24, 5 B-25's, and 6 P-38's are recalled due to weather.
The detachment of the 11th Fighter Squadron (P-40's), 343d Fighter Group that has been operating from Amchitka returns to it's base at Adak.
TUESDAY, 18 MAY 1943
6 B-24's, weathered out of Attu, bomb the Gertrude Cove area on Kiska Island leaving large fires. 4 P-40's reconnoiter Kiska and strafe barges. 1 B-25 flies photo reconnaissance over Kiska.
WEDNESDAY, 19 MAY 1943
6 B-24's and 11 B-25's fly 3 air-ground support missions to Attu Island, bombing the Sarana Valley. 4 P-40's fly 2 reconnaissance missions to Kiska Island.
THURSDAY, 20 MAY 1943
All air-ground support missions to Attu are cancelled due to weather. 20 P-40's bomb the Main Camp and submarine area at Kiska, and strafe barges in the harbor. The remaining Japanese on Attu are concentrated in the Chichagof Harbor area.
FRIDAY, 21 MAY 1943
10 B-24's, 12 B-25's, and 24 P-38's are dispatched to Attu but only 3 missions, totalling 6 P-38's and 1 B-24, are able to bomb and strafe troops and installations. 4 other missions, after vainly waiting for a break in the overcast over Attu, bomb the Kiska submarine base through the overcast.
SATURDAY, 22 MAY 1943
Bad weather forces cancellation of all missions. 15 enemy bombers make a torpedo attack on the gunboat USS Charleston (PG-51) and destroyer USS Phelps (DD-360) patrolling Attu. The ships suffer only negligible damage.
SUNDAY, 23 MAY 1943
6 B-24's and 12 B-25's fly 3 air-ground support missions to Attu. Due to bad weather they are routed to Kiska. Weather there is also poor and only 1 B-25 bombs the Main Camp area. Next, 3 B-24's and 18 P-38's fly 3 air cover missions to Attu. The last of these missions is notified by a PBY that 16 Japanese bombers are W of Attu. 5 of the P-38's then intercept the bombers over Attu, which jettison their bombs and close formation. The P-38's score 5 kills and 7 probables. 2 P- 38's are lost.
The 344th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group begins a movement from Fort Glenn, Umnak Island to Shemya Island, both in the Aleutians. The air echelon is operating with P-40's from Amchitka Island.
MONDAY, 24 MAY 1943
2 of 3 air-ground support missions to Attu, together 6 B-24's, 11 B-25's, and 1 F-5A, bomb Attu. The third mission is cancelled, except for 2 B-25's which do not hear the cancelling order. 3 B-24's and 14 P-38's fly 3 more air cover missions over Attu but make no contacts.
TUESDAY, 25 MAY 1943
12 B-25's and 15 B-24's fly air-ground support and 4 B-24's and 20 P-38's fly air cover, all over Attu. 18 P-40's fly 1 reconnaissance and 2 attack missions to Kiska and Little Kiska.
WEDNESDAY, 26 MAY 1943
8 B-24's and 11 B-25's, flying air-ground support, bomb enemy positions. 2 B-24's and l2 P-38's fly air cover sorties and also patrol and strafe Attu. Kiska is covered by 3 F-5A's photo sorties and 3 attack missions, flown by 9 B-25's and 16 P-40's. Targets include gun emplacements on North Head and the E end of the runway.
SATURDAY, 29 MAY 1943
No missions are flown. All of Attu Island is secure after 19 days of fighting. US ground forces land on Shemya Island.
SUNDAY, 30 MAY 1943
8 P-4O's fly 4 reconnaissance missions to Kiska. 3 air-ground support missions to Attu by 7 B-24's and 12 B-25's drop no bombs there and instead bomb Kiska installations. 2 B-24's and 12 P-38's fly air cover missions over Attu and patrol the area. 3 F-5A's fly photo reconnaissance and 8 P-40's attack and strafe tents and troops and blast the runway at Kiska.
MONDAY, 31 MAY 1943
Canadian CO Boomer was replaced by Squadron Leader D.L. Ramsey
5 F-5A's fly separate photo missions. 6 B-24's, 10 B-25's, 37 P-40's and 8 P-38's fly attack missions to Kiska. Their targets include Gertrude Cove, AA installations, trenches, the North Head runway, and a vessel.
TUESDAY, 1 JUNE 1943
2 P-40's, 1 B-24, and 1 F-5A fly weather reconnaissance and photo runs and 8 B-25's, 18 P-38's, and 20 P-40's, fly 7 attack missions to Kiska Island. Targets include parked aircraft and installations, runway, gun positions, radar, and tents on South Head, North Head, Gertrude Cove and Main Camp.
The 36th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 28th Composite Group, based on Amchitka Island begins operating from Adak Island with B-24's.
During Jun 43, the 73d Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 28th Composite Group transfers from Umnak Island to Amchitka Island with B-25's.
THURSDAY, 3 JUNE 1943
Weathered out from Kiska Island in the Aleutian Islands are 3 weather missions flown by 2 B-24's and 2 P-40's, as well as 2 attack missions by 2 B-24's and 6 fighters.
FRIDAY, 4 JUNE 1943
6 B-24's following a Navy PV make a radar-bombing run over North Head. 14 P-40's and P-38's bomb North Head, Main Camp and Little Kiska Island. 4 P-38's and 1 B-24 flying air cover over Attu Island make no enemy contact.
The 404th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 28th Composite Group based on Adak Island begins operating from Amchitka Island with B-24's.
SATURDAY, 5 JUNE 1943
7 B-24's, 6 B-25's, and 6 P-40's fly weather reconnaissance and radar-bombing missions over Kiska Island, being handicapped by poor weather and mechanical trouble.
TUESDAY, 8 JUNE 1943
A C-47 is the first USAAF airplane to land on Attu Island, landing fighters crews at Alexai Point. All other flying is cancelled due to weather.
THURSDAY, 10 JUNE 1943
7 B-24's, 8 B-25's, 12 P-40's, and 2 F-5A's fly weather reconnaissance, attack, and photo missions to Kiska Island and Little Kiska Island. Targets include gun batteries, runway, North Head and Main Camp.
FRIDAY, 11 JUNE 1943
7 B-24's, 8 B-25's, 10 P-40's, 4 P-38's, and 2 F-5A's fly weather, photo, reconnaissance, and attack missions to Kiska Island. Main targets are Gertrude Cove and Main Camp, South Head, North Head, runway, and offshore barges. Fighter bombing and strafing, and subsequent bomber runs over emplacements, are effectively coordinated.
Motor torpedo boat PT-22 was scrapped after being badly damaged in a storm at Dora Harbor, Unimak Is.
SATURDAY, 12 JUNE 1943
A detachment of the 344th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group based at Ft Glenn, Alaska begins operating from Attu Island with P-40's.
MONDAY, 21 JUNE 1943
A fighters strip is completed at Shemya Island. All missions are cancelled due to weather for the tenth straight day.
TUESDAY, 22 JUNE 1943
A P-40 sights a submarine 5 mi (8 km) E of Zeto Point. A B-24 then searches the area but makes no contact.
FRIDAY, 25 JUNE 1943
2 photo and weather reconnaissance missions by 2 B-24's and 6 attack missions by 25 B-25's, 12 B-24's, and 2 P-38's hit Kiska Island. Targets include gun revetments at Gertrude Cove and AA batteries.
The 344th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group transfers with P-40's from Ft Glenn, Alaska to Shemya Island. The squadron also has detachments operating from Amchitka and Attu Islands.
SATURDAY, 26 JUNE 1943
16 bombers and 28 fighters fly 7 attack, weather reconnaissance and photo missions to Kiska and Little Kiska Islands, starting fires. Intense machine gun fire damages 4 P-38's.
SUNDAY, 27 JUNE 1943
On Kiska Island, 8 B-24's make a radar run but return with their bombs due to weather. Later, 5 B-24's and 7 B-25's bomb the Main Camp area and vicinity N of Salmon Lagoon. 14 B-25's bomb Gertrude Cove, camp areas, and North Head, while 7 others abort due to weather. 2 P-40's fly reconnaissance over Segula Island but overcast prevents observations.
MONDAY, 28 JUNE 1943
6 B-25's bomb Gertrude Cove, Little Kiska Island and the southern Main Camp area through holes in the overcast. The mission is partly ineffective because of faulty bomb-release mechanisms.
THURSDAY, 1 JULY 1943
During the month of JULY:
  • The 21st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy) based on Umnak Island ceases operating from Amchitka Island, and
  • The detachment of the 344th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group that has been operating from Amchitka Island with P-40's since May 43 returns to it's base on Shemya Island, and
  • The 632d and 633d Bombardment Squadrons (Dive), 407th Bombardment Group (Dive) based at Drew Field, Tampa, Florida begin operating from Amchitka Island with A-36's.
FRIDAY, 2 JULY 1943
3 bombers and 4 P-38's fly 4 reconnaissance missions over Kiska and Segula Islands. 17 B-24's and 16 B-25's then attack Kiska Island in 5 missions, 2 of them radar-guided. Fires are started at several of the targets, which include Gertrude Cove, the harbor, and buildings in the Main Camp area. Intense AA fire damages 3 aircraft. 2 B-25's on a submarine attack hit the Kiska seaplane ramp after making no contact with the target. 2 P-40's cover troops which make an unopposed landing on Rat Island.
SATURDAY, 3 JULY 1943
6 B-24's bomb Main Camp on Kiska Island and take photos of Segula Island.
TUESDAY, 6 JULY 1943
2 B-24's and 2 P-40's on 3 weather reconnaissance missions report Kiska Island overcast, and take photos of Segula Island. 6 B-24's bomb Main Camp on Kiska. 8 B-25's abort a radar run over Kiska Island when 1 has engine trouble and the others fail to locate a PV Pathfinder. They sight a submarine which crash-dives immediately.
THURSDAY, 8 JULY 1943
9 B-25's fly a special mission to Attu Island in the Aleutian Islands.
FRIDAY, 9 JULY
(to 29 AUGUST) No. 14 Squadron (Canadian) to Amchitka. http://www.rcaf.com/aircraft/features/kittyhawk/index.php
SATURDAY, 10 JULY 1943
The Eleventh Air Force attacks the Japanese Home Islands for the first time as 8 B-25's raid Paramushiru Island in the Kurile Islands, scoring hits on the S part of Shimushu Island, Paramushiru Island, Kurile Strait, and northern Paramushiru Island, in dead reckoning runs when solid cloud cover prevents a maximum altitude attack. No AA fire is encountered and no enemy aircraft are sighted. The B-25's stage through Attu Island on returning to Adak Island. 6 B-24's, originally slated to accompany the B-25's to Paramushiru Island and 5 other B-25's are on short notice dispatched to attack a convoy off Attu Island. They claim 2 medium freighters sunk in deck-level strikes.
SUNDAY, 11 JULY 1943
5 B-24's take off to attack Paramushiru Island in the Kurile Islands and fly a shipping search but are turned back by bad weather. A shipping search by 5 B-25's finds nothing. 6 B-25's and 6 B-24's in 3 missions (one by radar) attack North Head and Main Camp on Kiska Island sighting new excavations near Sredni Point, strafe a tent near Haycock Rock, and also fly over Segula Island.
THURSDAY, 15 JULY 1943
1 B-24 and 2 P-39's fly reconnaissance over Kiska and Segula Islands. 9 B-24's and 14 B-25's bomb Kiska Island targets including AA batteries at North Head, Jeff Cove and Gertrude Cove. Fires are started. 1 bomber turns back with 3 engines and jettisons bombs, another crashes on return. AA fire damages a B-25.
SUNDAY, 18 JULY 1943
2 B-24's and 6 B-25's bomb Gertrude Cove and Main Camp on Kiska Island. 6 B-24's bomb shipping targets between Paramu- shiru Island and Shimushu Island in the Kurile Islands and completed runway at Murakami Bay on Paramushiru Island, which is also photographed. They observe fires among buildings S and E of this runway. Some of the observed aircraft take to the air and vainly pursue the attackers.
MONDAY, 19 JULY 1943
The 633d, 634th and 635th Bombardment Squadrons (Dive), 407th Bombardment Group (Dive), based at Drew Field, Tampa, Florida begin operating from Amchitka Island in the Aleutian Islands with A-24's. The squadron will fly combat missions 4-13 Aug.
WEDNESDAY, 21 JULY 1943
9 B-24's bomb Kiska Island targets, includ- ing the runway, North Head, and Main Camp area where fires are observed. Poor weather cancels other scheduled missions.
THURSDAY, 22 JULY 1943
26 B-25's, 17 B-24's, 13 P-40's, and 20 P-38's hit North Head, Main Camp, and the submarine base at Kiska Island, as well as coastal defenses and AA guns at both Kiska and Little Kiska Islands, starting numerous fires. Intense and heavy AA fire downs one B-25 (crew saved) and damages 18 aircraft of which another B-25 crashes at base. 1 B-25 photographs the S and W Kiska Island shores. 1 B-24 flies radar reconnaissance over Kiska Island. The 77th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 28th Composite Group, based on Adak Island begins operating from Attu Island with B-25's.
SATURDAY, 24 JULY 1943
62 P-40's fly 9 missions to Kiska Island [2 of them with Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) pilots] bombing the runway and scoring many hits. An AA battery takes a direct hit and explodes. AA guns are strafed on North Head and Little Kiska Island. Intense AA fire downs 1 P-40.
SUNDAY, 25 JULY 1943
40 P-40's fly 7 attack missions [2 by Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) pilots] against Kiska Island, bombing and strafing North Head AA batteries, the runway, Main Camp, and Little Kiska Island.
HQ 343d Fighter Group transfers from Adak Island to Amchitka Island.
The 406th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 41st Bombardment Group (Medium), based at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, begins operating from Adak Island with B-25's.
USS LST 205 called at Kodiak and left on 27 JULY 1943.
MONDAY, 26 JULY 1943
3 bombers and 5 fighters fly 5 armored reconnaissance missions to Kiska Island. 32 B-24's, 38 P-4O's, and 24 P-38's fly 13 attack raids, bombing and scoring hits on numerous Kiska Island and Little Kiska Island targets, including North Head, Main Camp, the runway, Gertrude Cove, AA batteries, and on a suspected submarine in Kiska Island harbor. A submarine is sighted near Rat Island. AA fire claims 1 P-40 (pilot rescued), and damages 3 others. 1 B-25 and 15 P-38's fly 2 air cover missions to Kiska Island for the US Navy. Over 1O4 tons of bombs are dropped on Kiska Island this day, highest one-day bomb load so far dropped by the Eleventh Air Force.
Phantom naval action known as the Battle of the Pips.
TUESDAY, 27 JULY 1943
12 bombers and 20 fighters take off on 5 attack missions to Kiska Island. Several of the fighters jettison bombs. The other aircraft hit Main Camp, North Head and Little Kiska Island.
The 21st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy) transfers from Umnak Island to Shemya, Island. The air echelon is operat- ing from Amchitka Island.
WEDNESDAY, 28 JULY 1943
Captain William M. McDade, USN became CO of NAS Kodiak until 30 AUGUST 1945.
Japanese forces on Kiska evacuated the entire garrison of more than five-thousand individuals.
THURSDAY, 29 JULY 1943
1 B-17 scouts Kiska Island and bombs the Main Camp area.
SUNDAY, 1 AUGUST 1943
7 B-24's bomb the Main Camp area on Kiska Island through the overcast.
151st Combat Engineers, Alabama NG, 161 of Co. B departed Kodiak. Had arrived 3 SEPTEMBER 1941.
MONDAY, 2 AUGUST 1943
8 B-24's, 9 B-25's, and 8 P-38's hit Kiska Island in 2 waves, bombing and strafing North Head, and coast guns on Little Kiska Island, scoring several hits. 1 or 2 enemy aircraft over Attu Island cannot be intercepted due to weather.
TUESDAY, 3 AUGUST 1943
6 attack missions, 2 of which abort, are flown to Kiska Island by B-24's, B-25's, P-38's, and P-40's; numerous targets hit and strafed include installations at North Head and South Head.
WEDNESDAY, 4 AUGUST 1943
Between 0855 and 1846 hours, 153 tons of bombs are dropped on Kiska Island, a new one-day record; 6 armored weather, photo and reconnaissance missions, flown by 3 B-24's, 2 P-40's, and 2 F-5A's bomb through clouds, take photos and observe fires in Main Camp and on Little Kiska Island; later 48 B-25's, 22 B-24's, 16 A-24's, 8 P-40's, and 40 P-38's fly 17 bombing and strafing attacks to Kiska Island; targets hit include buildings near the radio station, and the gun battery area on North Head. Little Kiska Island and Segula Island are also strafed.
The 36th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 28th Composite Group, which has been operating from Adak Island with B-24's since Jun 43, returns to it's base on Amchitka Island.
FRIDAY, 6 AUGUST 1943
38th Batttalion left Kodiak with 984 enlisted and 27 officers. They had arrived 14 Jan. 43.
8th S.Battalion arrived Kodiak 6 Aug. 1943 with 483 enlisted and 13 officers.
The 8th Special NC Battalion was activated in JUNE 1943 and left the States 30 JULY bound for Kodiak. The Battalion arrived at Kodiak on 6 AUGUST 1943, but half of the men were sent directly on to Attu. The Kodiak detachment was designated Section One.
The 8th Special Battalion arrived Kodiak to take over cargo operations. One half of the original unit reported to Attu and the force remaining in Kodiak consisted of 13 officers and 483 enlisted men. On 23 February 1944 this unit was split again, one half going to Dutch Harbor, leaving 8 officers and 244 enlisted men in Kodiak.
MONDAY, 9 AUGUST 1943
1 B-24 flies photo reconnaissance over various Kiska Island sites.
TUESDAY, 10 AUGUST 1943
P-38's, P-40's, A-24's, B-24's and B-25's bomb and strafe various targets on Kiska Island; direct hits are scored on revetments W of the Wheat Grove and on gun emplacements, as well as on buildings on Little Kiska Island. HQ Eleventh Air Force transfers from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage to Adak Island.
WEDNESDAY, 11 AUGUST 1943
No. 111 Squadron (Canadian) left Kodiak by sea.
B-24's, B-25's, A-24's, and P-38's pound Kiska Island targets in 11 attack missions; later, 10 reconnaissance, strafing and photo missions to Kiska are flown by 3 P-38's, 26 P-40's, 4 F-5A's and 1 B-24. 9 B-24's from Attu Island drop bombs and incendiaries on Paramushiru Island in the Kurile Islands, inclu- ding Kashiwabara Airfield and Shimushu Island where the Kataoka naval base and staging area are hit. 40 enemy aircraft challenge the attackers, which score 4 confirmed kills, 1 probable, and 4 possibles.
CANADA: The Quebec Conference begins. President Franklin D Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston S Churchill discuss the entire spectrum of world operations and decide on the future action of Anglo-US armed forces.
THURSDAY, 12 AUGUST 1943
B-24's and B-25's fly 26 bombing, strafing, and radar and photo reconnaissance sorties over Kiska Island targets from Adak Island. From Amchitka Island P-40's, P-38's, B-24's, B-25's, and A-24's fly 70 bombing sorties over the island and are joined by B-24's, P-40's, and F-5A's flying 6 reconnaissance and photo sorties. Targets include the runway, harbor and shipping installations, army barracks, and the Rose Hill area.
FRIDAY, 13 AUGUST 1943
7 B-25's from Adak Island bomb targets at Main Camp and North Head on Kiska and Little Kiska Islands. A B-24 flies a special reconnaissance mission. From Amchitka Island B-24's, B-25's, A-24's, and P-38's fly 8 more bombing missions against Kiska Island pounding the Camp area, gun emplacements, buildings, shipping, and airstrip revetments.
The 406th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 41st Bombardment Group (Medium), ceases operating from Adak Island with B-25's and returns to it's base at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage.
During the latter part of Aug 43, the 515th and 516th Fighter-Bomber Squadrons, 407th Fighter-Bomber Group, cease operating from Amchitka Island with A-24's and return to their base at Drew Field, Tampa, Florida.
SATURDAY, 14 AUGUST 1943
2 B-24's fly a special radar ferret and reconnaissance mission; 1 B-25, 8 B-24's, and 10 P-38's then fly 2 attack missions to Kiska Island, bombing with unobserved results.
SUNDAY, 15 AUGUST 1943
34,000 US and Canadian troops invade Kiska Island and confirm that the Japanese, under the cover of fog, evacuated their garrison. A P-38 bombs and strafes Sniper Hill.
The 635th Bombardment Squadron (Dive), 407th Fighter-Bomber Group, based at Drew Field, Tampa, Florida but operating from Amchitka Island, is disbanded and it's A-24's are transferred to other units.
COGHLAN II (DD-606) departed Aleutians.
MONDAY, 16 AUGUST 1943
A B-24 reconnaissance flight reconnoiters North Head, Main Camp, and northern Kiska Island, and observes friendly forces' unopposed advance into Main Camp.
TUESDAY, 17 AUGUST 1943
1 B-24 flies over Kiska Island watching friendly forces land on the shore of E Kiska Lake.
SATURDAY, 21 AUGUST 1943
During the Aleutian Campaign, 3 Jun 42 to 21 Aug 43, the Eleventh Air Force destroyed 69 aircraft, sank 21 and damaged 29 ships, and lost 29 of its own aircraft.
THURSDAY, 26 AUGUST 1943
The Eleventh Air Force's striking power shrinks rapidly as the the following squadrons are ordered to prepare for departure to the Zone of Interior (ZI):
21st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), on Umnak Island with B-24's,
36th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 28th Composite Group, on Amchitka Island with B-24's,
73d Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 28th Composite Group, on Amchitka Island with B-25's, and
406th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 41st Bombardment Group (Medium), at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, with B-25's.
SUNDAY, 29 AUGUST 1943
(9 JULY to 29 AUGUST) No. 14 Squadron (Canadian) left Amchitka http://www.rcaf.com/aircraft/features/kittyhawk/index.php
MONDAY, 30 AUGUST 1943
The 73d Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 28th Composite Group, based on Amchitka Island with B-25's, begins a movement back to the US.
152nd Ordnance Company departed Kodiak.
TUESDAY, 31 AUGUST 1943
45th Battalion departed Kodiak 31 Aug. 1943 with 1035 enlisted and 27 officers. They had arrived Kodiak 28 Jan. 1943.
WEDNESDAY, 1 SEPTEMBER 1943
P-40's attempting to intercept Japanese aircraft reported near Attu Island in the Aleutian Islands abort because of weather.
SATURDAY, 4 SEPTEMBER 1943
HQ XI Bomber Command transfers from Amchitka Island to Adak Island in the Aleutian Islands.
THURSDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER 1943
At Umnak Island, Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) No 14 (Fighter) Squadron prepares to depart for British Columbia, Canada.
USAT NORTH COAST and SS WHITNEY simultaneously docked as the first ships at the new 902 foot pier in Kodiak.
FRIDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER 1943
9 B-24's fly from Adak to Attu in preparation for a mission to Paramushiru Island in the Kuriles tomorrow.
SATURDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER 1943
12 B-25's and 8 B-24's attack Paramushiru Island in the Kurile Islands for the third and last time this year. 6 B-24's bomb the Kashiwabara staging area; shipping is bombed and strafed in Kashiwabara harbor and Paramushiru Straits; 1 freighter and 1 large transport are sunk while 1 transport and 2 cargo ships are damaged; 2 other cargo vessels sustain possible hits; targets hit on land include 2 buildings and an AA battery on Shimushu Island. Of 40 fighters giving battle, 13 are shot down and 3 more are probables. 2 B-24's force-land in the USSR, one with mechanical defect, the other after being hit; 1 B-24 is downed by AA fire; losses are 7 B-25's and 2 B-24's in this most disastrous day for the Eleventh Air Force. It will be another 5 months before it is able to strike at the Kurils again.
The 77th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 28th Composite Group, transfers from Adak Island to Amchitka Island with B-25's.
SUNDAY, 12 SEPTEMBER 1943
HQ XI Fighter Command transfers from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage to Adak Island.
MONDAY, 13 SEPTEMBER 1943
Major General Davenport Johnson succeeds Major General William O Butler as Commanding General of the Eleventh Air Force.
The 36th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 28th Composite Group, begins a movement from Amchitka Island to McChord Field, Washington with B-24's. The squadron will transfer to England in Nov 43.
TUESDAY, 14 SEPTEMBER 1943
Motor torpedo boat PT-219 was damaged in storm and scrapped, near Attu.
WEDNESDAY, 15 SEPTEMBER 1943
No. 14 Squadron (Canadian) left Umnak in the Aleutians for ?
SUNDAY, 19 SEPTEMBER 1943
The 21st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), begins a movement from Shemya Island with B-24's to Smoky Hill AAFld, Kansas where it will be inactivated on 1 Nov 43.
22 SEPTEMBER 1943
Sand Point radio commissioned. (Base since early 1942.)
THURSDAY, 23 SEPTEMBER 1943
Admiral Thomas C Kinkaid issues Operations Plan (Op Plan) 9-43 which reorganizes the Alaskan Army and Navy air strength. The Commanding General Eleventh Air Force becomes Commander of Task Force 90 (TF 90), composed of Task Group 90.1 (TG 90.1), designated the Air Striking Unit (comprising 16 medium bombers, 12 heavy bombers, 100 fighters) and of TG 90.2, designated the Air Search Group, a Navy air arm. For operations, the Eleventh Air Force is now under the jurisdiction of Commander Northern Pacific (COMNORPAC) Forces. There is no administrative change.
SATURDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 1943
4th N.C.Reg. departed Kodiak 25 Sept. 1943 with 89 enlisted and 8 officers. They had arrived 15 Jan. 1943.
The 4th Naval Construction Regiment was disbanded on 25 SEPTEMBER 1943 and the remaining Army Construction was assigned to the 41st and 43rd Battalions for completion while the balance of Navy Construction was assigned to the Station Public Works Department, comprised of the 79th Battalion and regular station employees.
OCTOBER 1943
Admiral Kinkaid detached, ordered to South Pacific.
FRIDAY, 8 OCTOBER 1943
Girls were staffing the navy PX for the first time. *
SATURDAY, 9 OCTOBER 1943
12 Kuril-based Japanese bombers attack Attu Island.
WEDNESDAY, 13 OCTOBER 1943
11 P-40's unsuccessfully intercept 8 Japanese medium bombers attacking Massacre Bay and the nearby airfield on Attu Island in the Aleutian Islands.
MONDAY, 18 OCTOBER 1943
The 406th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), Fourth Air Force, departs Elmendorf Field, Anchorage for the US. The squadron will transition from B-25's to B-24's and arrive in England on 2 Nov 43.
THURSDAY, 28 OCTOBER 1943
YP-88 was destroyed by grounding at Amchitka.
NOVEMBER 1943
Anti-torpedo nets installed at Kodiak.
FRIDAY, 19 NOVEMBER 1943
110 foot submarine chaser USS SC-1067 foundered off Attu. The Red River Mining and Developing Company now has 18 claims of 20 acres on Kodiak Island, in the area where there is a 1200 square mile glacial area. Glacial till of debris, discloses platinum in a 1:15 relation with gold, along with some titanium, according to reports. *
WEDNESDAY, 1 DECEMBER 1943
During the month of Dec 43, the detachment of the 344th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group, operating from Attu Island with P-40's, returns to it's base at Shemya Island.
SATURDAY, 4 DECEMBER 1943
3 bombers return early from an armed seasearch, due to weather.
WEDNESDAY, 8 DECEMBER 1943
3 B-24's fly armed reconnaissance. During the night of 8/9 Dec, another B-24 off on a photographic mission over Kasatochi Island in the Aleutian Islands, turns back because of mechanical trouble.
FRIDAY, 17 December 1943
The new Fort Greely Ski Chalet provides a comfortable rendezvous for the men when they get back into the mountains. Planned for all-year recreation, it will be just as useful when the snow is gone. *
SATURDAY, 1 JANUARY 1944
SeaBees strength in Alaska at 20,000 men and 500 officers.
MONDAY, 10 JANUARY 1944
Minesweper USS YMS-127 was sunk in the Aleutian Islands
SATURDAY, 22 JANUARY 1944
HQ 343d Fighter Group transfers from Amchitka Island, Aleutian Islands to Alexai Point, Alaska.
SUNDAY, 23 JANUARY 1944
201st Infantry Regiment, West Virginia National Guard departed Kodiak. (37mm antitank guns)
MONDAY, 31 JANUARY 1944
5 bombers fly a negative sea-search mission.
FEBRUARY 1944
Naval light cruisers and destroyers, operating out of the Aleutians, began shore bombardment and anti-shipping missions against Paramushiro and other positions in the Kuriles, as well as in the Sea of Okhotsk.
SATURDAY, 5 FEBRUARY 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 6 B-24s and 16 P-38s join USN aircraft to fly air cover in several relays during retirement of US light cruisers and destroyers following bombardment of installations in the Kurabu Cape-Musashi Bay areas; shortly afterwards, the aircraft also photograph and attack installations at Paramushiru and Shimushu.
FRIDAY, 11 FEBRUARY 1944
77th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 28th Bombardment Group (Composite), moves from Amchitka Island to Attu Island with B-25s.
WEDNESDAY, 23 FEBRUARY 1944
The 8th Special Battalion, in Kodiak since 25 SEPTEMBER 1943 was split again, one half going to Dutch Harbor, leaving 8 officers and 244 enlisted men in Kodiak.
THURSDAY, 24 FEBRUARY 1944
3 B-24s from Shemya Island search for enemy shipping; 1 B-24 crashes during takeoff, the others find nothing.
FRIDAY, 25 FEBRUARY 1944
3 B-24s from Shemya Island are over Matsuwa Island shortly after midnight 24/25 Feb on a photographic reconnaissance and bomb run; the mission is not completed due to weather.
SATURDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 1944
XI Bomber Command (Air Striking Group Task Group 90.1) is directed to conduct armed photographic reconnaissance missions in the Kurile Islands, day or night, as weather permits.
HQ 28th Bombardment Group (Composite) moves from Adak Island to Shemya Island.
215th Coast Artillery began departing Kodiak. Last gone by 19 APRIL 1944. Had been in Kodiak since winter 1940.
Net laying ship USS Ailanthus (AN-38) was lost by grounding in the Aleutian Islands.
MONDAY, 28 FEBRUARY
3 B-24s from Shemya Island search for enemy shipping; 1 B-24 crashes during takeoff, the others find nothing.
MARCH 1944
The last 12 units of the 250th Coast Artillery, California National Guard, departed Kodiak.
WEDNESDAY, 1 MARCH 1944
XI Strategic Air Force (Provisional) is activated at Shemya Island. It includes all units of the XI Bomber Command and XI Fighter Command stationed at Near Island, and is only a tactical operating agency without administrative functions.
THURSDAY, 2 MARCH 1944
9 B-24s fly a futile shipping search over the Kurile Islands; turned back by a weather front, they either jettison or bring back their bombs.
FRIDAY, 3 MARCH 1944
9 B-24s take off from Shemya Island to search for enemy shipping, but return due to heavy icing and squalls; 6 P-40s fly a search mission between Shemya and halfway to Attu Island; and HQ XI Bomber Command moves from Adak Island to Shemya Island.
41st Battalion departed Kodiak with 1014 enlisted and 27 officers. They had arrived 28 Jan. 1943.
TUESDAY, 7 MARCH 1944
B-24s and B-25s fly a negative search mission for an enemy submarine.
WEDNESDAY, 8 MARCH 1944
Bombers fly negative search and patrol missions for an enemy submarine; B-24s fly cover for a convoy en route from Adak to Shemya Islands.
THURSDAY, 16 MARCH 1944
3 B-24s take off from Shemya Island shortly before midnight 15/16 Mar to fly armed reconnaissance over Matsuwa Island, Kurile Islands, but turn back prematurely. Some of the bombers jettison their bombloads over the target area.
FRIDAY, 17 MARCH 1944 - ST PATRICK'S DAY
3 B-24s fly armed reconnaissance over Onnekotan Island, Kurile Islands, before dawn releasing bombs through the overcast.
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH 1944
A detachment of the 11th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group, begins operating from Amchitka Island with P-40s and P-38s; the squadron is based on Adak Island.
FRIDAY, 24 MARCH 1944
3 B-24s fly a photographic mission over Onnekotan Island.
SATURDAY, 25 MARCH 1944
2 Shemya Island-based B-24s bomb Kurabu Cape and the N coast of Onnekotan Island.
TUESDAY, 28 MARCH 1944
18th Fighter Squadron, 343d Fighter Group, moves from Amchitka Island to Attu Island, Aleutian Islands with P-38s.
FRIDAY, 31 MARCH 1944
HQ XI Bomber Command and HQ XI Fighter Command are disbanded. Their headquarters personnel are absorbed by the 28th Bombardment Group (Composite) and the 343d Fighter Group, respectively.
FRIDAY, 7 APRIL 1944
8 B-24s dispatched to destroy a convoy, believed SE of Matsuwa Island, Kurile Islands, turn back due to engine, navigation and weather difficulties. A flight of F-7As of the 2d Photographic Charting Squadron, 1st Photographic Charting Group, 311th Photographic Wing (Mapping and Charting), arrives in the Aleutian Islands; its mission is mapping of the Kurile Islands. The squadron is based at Peterson Field, Colorado Springs, Colorado and sends detachments to various parts of the world to photo map.
SUNDAY, 9 APRIL 1944
A weather sortie over Matsuwa Island is negative due to low clouds and fog.
MONDAY, 10 APRIL 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 3 B-24s fly armed reconnaissance over Matsuwa and Onnekotan Islands.
TUESDAY, 11 APRIL 1944
Of 3 B-24s attempting to fly a photographic and bombing run over Matsuwa Island installations, 2 must turn back; the third bombs the runway area.
THURSDAY, 13 APRIL 1944
3 B-24s fly armed reconnaissance and bombing runs over the airfield on Matsuwa Island and installations on Onnekotan Island.
FRIDAY, 14 APRIL 1944
3 B-24s fly armed photo reconnaissance mission during early the morning over Matsuwa, Onnekotan, and Paramushiru Islands, Kurile Islands. Photographs taken are negative due to cloud cover.
SATURDAY, 15 APRIL 1944
During the night of 14/15 Apr 3 B-24s on armed reconnaissance mission over Matsuwa and Onnekotan Islands hit several targets including Matsuwa Airfield; reconnaissance over Paramushiru Island fails due to overcast.
Rear Adm. F. E. M. Whiting, Seventeenth Naval District Commanding Officer, established permanent headquarters at Kodiak.
TUESDAY, 18 APRIL 1944
3 B-24s fly armed reconnaissance over Matsuwa, Onnekotan, and Paramushiru Islands; cloud cover and lack of moonlight permit only bombing of Kashiwabara Airfield and the Banjo Cape area.
THURSDAY, 20 APRIL 1944
A B-24 aborts a weather mission to Shasukotan Island, Kurile Islands
SATURDAY, 22 APRIL 1944
A weather sortie is aborted soon after take off due to weather.
SUNDAY, 23 APRIL 1944
3 B-24s fly weather and photographic reconnaissance within 100 mi (160 km) of the Kurile Islands and photograph Matsuwa Island.
MONDAY, 24 APRIL 1944
In the Kurile Islands, a B-24 flies a photo and bombing run over Matsuwa Island; later another B-24 flies weather and bombing runs over Shasukotan, Yekaruma, Kharimkotan, and Onnekotan Islands.
TUESDAY, 25 APRIL 1944
3 B-24s photograph and bomb installations on Matsuwa Island.
THURSDAY, 27 APRIL 1944
A B-25 bombs a submarine without success.
SATURDAY, 29 APRIL 1944
2 B-24s abort an armed photographic mission due to weather.
MONDAY, 1 MAY 1944
A single weather sortie is flown.
YP-95 wasdestroyed by grounding at Adak.
TUESDAY, 2 MAY 1944
862nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery, departed Kodiak.
THURSDAY, 5 MAY 1944
374th Port Battalion, Transportation Corps departed Kodiak. Had arrived 27 November 1942, 4 Off., 236 em.
WEDNESDAY, 10 MAY 1944
The Eleventh directs its components to place more emphasis on photographing and bombing of specific targets instead of general reconnaissance.
FRIDAY, 12 MAY 1944
1 B-24 reconnoiters and bombs installations on Matsuwa Island, Kurile Islands, concentrating on the airfield on Tagan Cape.
SATURDAY, 13 MAY 1944
1 B-25 flies a shipping strike and strafes 2 fishing vessels.
THURSDAY, 18 MAY 1944
Over the Kurile Islands, a B-24 on weather reconnaissance attacks a Japanese aircraft and 2 B-25s sink an auxiliary vessel; another is sunk shortly before 2400 hours by 2 other B-25s.
FRIDAY, 19 MAY 1944
A B-24 flies armed reconnaissance over Shimushu and Ketoi Islands, Kurile Islands.
MONDAY, 22 MAY 1944
2 Attu Island, Aleutian Island-based B-25s on a shipping strike near Paramushiru bomb and strafe a picket boat, which is left sinking.
WEDNESDAY, 24 MAY 1944
2 bombers fly weather and photo reconnaissance over Shimushu Island and bomb the Matsuwa Island area.
THURSDAY, 25 MAY 1944
1 Shemya Island, Aleutian Islands-based B-24 flies reconnaissance and bombing mission in the C Kurile Islands; another B-24 aborts due to equipment failure.
FRIDAY, 26 MAY 1944
2 B-24s off on an armed photo mission over Shimushu Island turn back due to mechanical troubles. The clerk of the local board located in Kodiak, was responsible for making up all the necessary papers putting her own husband into the United States Army. *
SATURDAY, 27 MAY 1944
2 bombers fly weather and armed photo reconnaissance and bomb Ushishiru Island, Kurile Islands.
SUNDAY, 28 MAY 1944
2 B-24s fly reconnaissance and drop bombs on Shimushu and Matsuwa Islands. 1 B-25 and P-38s fly a guardship coverage mission, 2 other B-25s fly a negative anti-shipping sweep.
MONDAY, 29 MAY 1944
At dawn 2 B-25s photograph and bomb Shimushu and Matsuwa Islands (secondary). During the early afternoon 2 B-25s escorted by 4 P-38s strafe, bomb and sink a patrol boat in the Kurile Islands. Later 4 other B-25s unsuccessfully attack 2 vessels off Shimushu.
TUESDAY, 30 MAY 1944
1 B-25 and 2 P-38s fly guardship cover.
WEDNESDAY, 31 MAY 1944
During the morning 2 B-25s and 4 P-38s fly guardship cover. A bomber flies a weather mission while another reconnoiters and hits Buroton Bay, Kurile Islands.
THURSDAY, 1 JUNE 1944
2 B-24s from Shemya Island, Aleutian Islands photograph and bomb installations at Buroton Bay, Kurile Islands, including a suspected seaplane base and the harbor area. Of 2 B-25s and 4 P-38s taking off for a guardship cover mission, 3 aircraft abort with engine trouble; 2 other B-25s fly a negative antishipping sweep.
FRIDAY, 2 JUNE 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 2 B-24s, finding Shimushiru Island overcast, bomb and photograph Matsuwa Island (the secondary) during dawn.
SATURDAY, 3 JUNE 1944
2 B-25s and 2 P-38s fly guardship cover; 2 other B-25s fly a negative shipping search.
SUNDAY, 4 JUNE 1944
2 B-24s fly an uneventful reconnaissance over Shimushiru Island; fuel shortage and equipment failure prevent flying to Matsuwa Island (the secondary). Later, a B-25 and 2 P-38s fly a guardship cover mission.
TUESDAY, 13 JUNE 1944
During the night of 12/13 Jun 6 B-24s dispatched to fly an offensive sweep and provide air cover for a naval task force abort the missions due to weather.
WEDNESDAY, 14 JUNE 1944
4 B-24s fly extensive photo reconnaissance over the C and N Kurile Islands; they are attacked by about 20 fighters of which 3 are damaged.
THURSDAY, 15 JUNE 1944
2 B-24s fly armed photo reconnaissance over Shimushiru Island.
SATURDAY, 17 JUNE 1944
12 B-25s fly 3 air missions for a Naval Task Force on withdrawal, following the shelling of Kurabu Cape installations on Paramushiru Island, Kurile Islands.
MONDAY, 19 JUNE 1944
2 B-24s fly armored photo reconnaissance over Paramushiru Island and bomb the Suribachi area with unobserved results.
TUESDAY, 20 JUNE 1944
EUROPEAN THEATER OF OPERATIONS (ETO) STRATEGIC OPERATIONS (Eighth Air Force): Mission 425: In the morning 1,548 bombers are dispatched to attack 14 strategic targets in N Germany and V-weapon sites in France; 49 bombers are lost:
Joe Stevens is born.
FRIDAY, 23 JUNE 1944 2 B-25s fly a negative shipping sweep.
SATURDAY, 24 JUNE 1944
3 B-24s at dawn bomb the area N of the airfield at Kurabu Cape on Paramushiru Island; later 2 B-25s fly a negative shipping search.
SUNDAY, 25 JUNE 1944
Two B-24s bomb the airfield at Kurabu Cape, Paramushiru Island.
MONDAY, 26 JUNE 1944
12 B-25s fly three 4-plane air cover missions for a Naval task force on withdrawal following shelling of Kurabu Cape installations on Paramushiru Island.
THURSDAY, 29 JUNE 1944
2 B-25s fly a negative shipping sweep.
SATURDAY, 1 JULY 1944
At dawn in the Kurile Islands, 4 B-24s radar- bomb southern Shimushu Island and Kurabu Cape Airfield, Paramushiru Island through overcast.
SATURDAY, 22 JULY 1944
In the Aleutian Islands, 2 B-25s flying a negative shipping search encounter a bomber which evades contact.
MONDAY, 24 JULY 1944
In the Aleutian Islands, 2 B-25s fly a negative shipping search.
SATURDAY, 29 JULY 1944
3 B-24s fly bombing and reconnaissance runs over Shimushu Island and Paramushiru Island sites including Kurabu Cape installations.
FRIDAY, 4 AUGUST 1944
4 P-38s accompanied by 1 B-25 fly top cover for a naval force near Massacre Bay, Attu Island, Aleutian Islands; 4 B-25s fly an uneventful shipping sweep.
SATURDAY, 5 AUGUST 1944
A weather mission is followed by a shipping sweep flown by 2 B-25s which is aborted early due to weather.
THURSDAY, 10 AUGUST 1944
4 B-25s on a shipping sweep spot 2 patrol boats 75 miles (121 km) ESE of Shimushu Island, Kurile Islands; one is sunk, the other is damaged.
SATURDAY, 12 AUGUST 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 4 B-24s and 2 F-7As over Paramushiru and Shimushu Islands hit targets which include shipping in Higashi Banjo Strait and buildings and runway on Suribachi; enemy fighters give battle; the B-24s score 3 kills and 13 probables and damaged; 6 more B-25s fly an uneventful shipping sweep and take photos over Shimushiru Island.
SUNDAY, 13 AUGUST 1944
In the Kurile Islands, of 3 B-24s departing Shemya Island, Aleutian Islands during the night of 12/13 Aug, 1 aborts while the other 2 bomb the Kashiwabara staging area on Paramushiru Island; later 6 B-25s fly a shipping sweep E of the N Kurils during which a fighter is downed.
SATURDAY, 19 AUGUST 1944
In the Aleutian Islands, a weather sortie and a 4-plane shipping sweep are flown with negative results.
SUNDAY, 20 AUGUST 1944
In the Aleutian Islands, 4 B-25s fly a negative shipping sweep.
FRIDAY, 25 AUGUST 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 1 B-24 flies reconnaissance over Shasukotan, Onnekotan, and Harumukotan Islands but drops no bombs due to accurate AA fire.
SATURDAY, 26 AUGUST 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 3 B-24s hit the Kashiwabara staging area on Paramushiru Island during the early morning, starting several fires; later 6 B-25s strafe and bomb the E coast of the N Kurile Islands, sinking a patrol boat; 1 out of 4 interceptors and one of the B-25s are hit; 7 more B-24s bomb targets on Kashiwabara and on Otomari Cape, including docks, piers, boats, and a fuel dump. 6 P-38s unsuccessfully attempt to intercept 4 unidentified aircraft W of Attu Island.
SUNDAY, 27 AUGUST 1944
5 B-24s bomb and photograph Kashiwabara, Parmushiru Island in 2 raids; and 4 B-25s on a shipping sweep E of the N Kurile Islands bomb and strafe picket boats damaging 1 and leaving another sinking.
FRIDAY, 1 SEPTEMBER 1944
A B-24 bombs Kashiwabara on Paramushiru Island, Kurile Islands during the night of 31 Aug/1 Sep; a B-25 bombs a shack on the SW coast of Paramushiru Island and sinks a nearby ship; and 5 other B-25s on this mission turn back due to overcast.
MONDAY, 4 SEPTEMBER 1944
6 B-25s fly an antishipping sweep close to Paramushiru Island and draw shore-based AA fire; 8 fighters intercept but there are no losses on either side.
THURSDAY, 7 SEPTEMBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 6 B-25s on a shipping sweep attack a small fishing fleet between Paramushiru and Onnekotan Islands.
SATURDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER 1944
6 B-25s hunt shipping off Paramushiru Island; 4 return to Attu Island, Aleutian Islands with bombs, finding no targets; one hits the mast of a vessel and ditches in the water; the other lands on one engine in Petropavlovsk, USSR; 3 B-24s make an uneventful raid during the night of 9/10 Sep on Kashiwabara, Paramushiru Island; later 2 photo planes escorting 2 bombers over the Kurile Islands on a mapping project are attacked by fighters which inflict no damage.
SUNDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER 1944
6 B-25s fly shipping sweep off Suribachi, Kurile Islands.
MONDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER 1944
4 B-25s on a shipping search sink a small craft off Shimushu Island, Kurile Islands; 2 other B-25s fly a search mission for a B-25 (which force-landed in USSR on 9 Sep but is still reported as missing).
TUESDAY, 12 SEPTEMBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 6 bombers fly a negative shipping sweep over Shimushu Island; 3 more attack Suribachi Airfield and offshore shipping targets; 1 B-24 flies negative reconnaissance.
THURSDAY, 14 SEPTEMBER 1944
During the night of 13/14 Sep 3 B-24s strike Kurabu Cape shipping and airfield on Paramushiru Island.
SATURDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 1944
3 B-24s bomb Kataoka naval base on Shimushu Island; 4 B-25s abort a shipping sweep due to weather and mechanical difficulties.
SUNDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 2 B-24s abort a mission to Suribachi due to weather. 4 B-25s fly an unsuccessful shipping sweep.
TUESDAY, 19 SEPTEMBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 2 B-25s fly a shipping sweep over Tomari Cape; and 4 B-24s off to strike Kurabu Cape turn back due to weather and mechanical failures.
SATURDAY, 23 SEPTEMBER 1944
26th S.Battalion arrived Kodiak 23 Sept. 1944 with 526 enlisted and 16 officers.
SUNDAY, 24 SEPTEMBER 1944
8 B-24s striking Kurabu Cape Airfield on Paramushiru Island are challenged by 12 Japanese fighters and 1 of 2 damaged B-24s forcelands in the USSR; one fighter is downed; and 4 B-25s fly a negative shipping search.
MONDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 1944
2 B-25s fly a negative shipping sweep.
TUESDAY, 26 SEPTEMBER 1944
A B-24 flies weather reconnaissance; later 4 B-24s radar-bomb Suribachi Airfield in the Kurile Islands.
FRIDAY, 29 SEPTEMBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 2 B-24s bomb Katooka naval base and Kokutan Cape.
OCTOBER 1944
Cape Greville radio turned over to Coast Guard.
MONDAY, 2 OCTOBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, photo reconnaissance missions, by 4 B-25s to Paramushiru Island and by 2 B-24s to Onnekotan Island, abort due to weather.
TUESDAY, 3 OCTOBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 2 B-24s flying offshore reconnaissance over Onnekotan, Harumukotan, and Shasukotan Islands also strafe several small vessels.
WEDNESDAY, 4 OCTOBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, a B-24 weather-aborts a photo run off Matsuwa Island; 4 B-25s bomb a freighter and a barge off Shimushu Island; 15-17 fighters intercept and the B-25s score 1 victory.
79th Battalion departed Kodiak 4 Oct. 1944 with 1080 enlisted and 27 officers. They had arrived 10 May 1943.
THURSDAY, 5 OCTOBER 1944
At dawn on Paramushiru Island, 2 B-24s bomb Kashiwabara and Kurabu Cape.
SUNDAY, 8 OCTOBER 1944
Photo missions to Paramushiru, Matsuwa, Onnekotan and Shasukotan Islands turn back due to weather.
TUESDAY, 10 OCTOBER 1944
4 B-24s abort a strike at Kashiwabara, Paramushiru Island due to weather.
WEDNESDAY, 11 OCTOBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 4 B-25s over Shimushiru and Paramushiru Islands blow up 3 buildings and damage 2 others at Cape Namikawa.
THURSDAY, 12 OCTOBER 1944
B-24s hit the airfield and shipping targets in the Matsuwa Island-Onnekotan Island area.
FRIDAY, 13 OCTOBER 1944
On Paramushiru Island, 4 B-25s bomb Kurabu Airfield and bomb and strafe buildings on Tomari Cape, scoring hits on canneries, warehouses, and barracks; later, 4 B-24s photograph and bomb targets at Kashiwabara.
SATURDAY, 14 OCTOBER 1944
4 B-25s bomb and strafe buildings at Otomae Bay, Kurile Islands.
SUNDAY, 15 OCTOBER 1944
4 B-25s on armed reconnaissance over Paramushiru Island turn back when the flight drifts off course; 1 B-24 strafes a freighter off Shimushiru Island.
MONDAY, 16 OCTOBER 1944
7 B-24s fly cover sorties for a naval task force,
TUESDAY, 17 OCTOBER 1944
7 B-24s fly cover sorties for a naval task force.
WEDNESDAY, 18 OCTOBER 1944
4 B-25s bomb Kurabu Cape Airfield on Paramushiru Island and Suribachi; 8-12 interceptors attack the B-25s, which claim 2 victories.
THURSDAY, 19 OCTOBER 1944
A B-24 bombs Kurabu Cape on Paramushiru Island.
MONDAY, 23 OCTOBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 3 B-24s hit Kashiwabara targets on Paramushiru Island; 3 more B-24s bomb Otomari and fly a photo mission over Onnekotan Island; and 5 B-25s bomb the Asahi Bay area.
TUESDAY, 24 OCTOBER 1944
On Paramushiru Island in the Kurile Islands, 3 B-24s bomb Kashiwabara and Kurabu Cape; 4 B-25s weather-abort a photo mission to the island; 2 others on a shipping sweep off Kurabu hit a freighter, which is observed listing and smoking, and strafe 2 subchasers.
THURSDAY, 26 OCTOBER 1944
Of 6 B-24s which abort a naval task force cover mission after failing to find the ships, 2 bomb installations on Onnekotan Island.
FRIDAY, 27 OCTOBER 1944
7 B-24s weather-abort an attempt to fly cover for a naval task force.
SATURDAY, 28 OCTOBER 1944
8 B-25s fly cover for a naval task force.
SUNDAY, 29 OCTOBER 1944
On Paramushiru Island, 4 B-25s on reconnaissance hit Tomari Cape buildings and a freighter which is left listing.
MONDAY, 30 OCTOBER 1944
3 B-24s fly armed reconnaissance over Matsuwa and Onnekotan Islands.
TUESDAY, 31 OCTOBER 1944
4 B-25s score direct hits on a cannery at Tomari Cape on Paramushiru Island and leave nearby buildings burning; 1 of 2 B-25s hit by AA heads for and safely lands in the USSR.
WEDNESDAY, 1 NOVEMBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, a B-24 on an armed weather mission bombs Otomari Cape.
THURSDAY, 2 NOVEMBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 4 B-24s bomb Suribachi on Paramushiru Island and Onnekotan Island; 4 B-25s on a photo and offensive sweep bomb targets at Torishima Island and Hayakegawa setting fire to 15 buildings, including a cannery.
SATURDAY, 4 NOVEMBER 1944
6 B-24s strike the airfield, buildings, and offshore shipping at Suribachi and Kurabu on Paramushiru Island.
SUNDAY, 5 NOVEMBER 1944
4 B-25s abort an offensive sweep off Suribachi on Paramushiru Island due to intense shore fire; 4 more B-25s fly armed reconnaissance over Shimushu Island and at decklevel bomb Torishima Island targets; of 4 fighters intercepting the B-25s, 1 is downed; 4 B-24s bomb Onnekotan and Matsuwa Islands; 3 more B-24s bomb Katalka naval base on Shimushu Island, starting fires; 7 fighters intercept and the B-24s down 1.
MONDAY, 6 NOVEMBER 1944
In the Kurile Islands, 4 B-25s bomb Torishima Island, score a hit on a large building, sink two nearby barges, and probably hit other shipping targets; about 20 fighters intercept, downing 1 B-25; the B-25s claim 3 victories.
TUESDAY, 7 NOVEMBER 1944
NAAF Cold Bay decommissioned. Army still there.
WEDNESDAY, 8 NOVEMBER 1944
An 8-aircraft shipping sweep is cancelled due to weather.
THURSDAY, 9 NOVEMBER 1944
An 8-plane armed reconnaissance sweep and a 4-plane bombing mission are cancelled due to weather.
SUNDAY, 12 NOVEMBER 1944
2 B-24s fly armed reconnaissance over Onnekotan and Matsuwa Islands.
WEDNESDAY, 15 NOVEMBER 1944
8 B-25s weather-abort an armed photo reconnaissance over Paramushiru Island.
FRIDAY, 17 NOVEMBER 1944
4 B-24s bomb Suribachi Airfield on Paramushiru Island; 2 fighters intercept and damage 1 B-24 which force-lands on Kamchatka, USSR.
SATURDAY, 18 NOVEMBER 1944
On Paramushiru Island, 4 B-24s strike Suribachi shore batteries, including one on Takikawa Cape. A shipping sweep by 6 B-25s is cancelled due to weather.
MONDAY, 20 NOVEMBER 1944
3 B-24s fly an air cover mission for the US Navy.
TUESDAY, 21 NOVEMBER 1944
Advance HQ Eleventh AF is established on Shemya Island, Aleutian Islands with Brigadier General Harry A Johnson as Deputy Commander. 5 B-24s fly air coverage for naval units; another fleet coverage mission by 10 B-25s is cancelled due to weather; before clearance can be obtained from the Soviets through diplomatic channels, a B-24 air- drops provisions to a marooned crew of a B-24 which forcelanded on Kamchatka USSR on 17 Nov 44.
WEDNESDAY, 22 NOVEMBER 1944
4 B-25s abort an air coverage mission due to weather.
SATURDAY, 25 NOVEMBER 1944
A B-24 aborts an armed photo mission over Matsuwa Island due to weather and instead radarbombs Kurabu Airfield on Paramushiru Island; B-25s cancel a shipping sweep due to weather.
SUNDAY, 26 NOVEMBER 1944
A shipping sweep by 4 B-25s is called off due to weather.
TUESDAY, 28 NOVEMBER 1944
1 B-24 photographs and bombs the Matsuwa Island shore area in the Kurile Islands.
WEDNESDAY, 29 NOVEMBER 1944
3 B-24s bomb Kashiwabara on Paramushiru Island. B-25s call off a shipping sweep due to weather.
THURSDAY, 30 NOVEMBER 1944
A weather sortie is the only mission.
MONDAY, 4 DECEMBER 1944
A weather aircraft aborts shortly after takeoff.
TUESDAY, 5 DECEMBER 1944
6 B-24s off for a strike on Kakumabetsu in the Kurile Islands abort due to weather and B-25s cancel a shipping sweep.
WEDNESDAY, 6 DECEMBER 1944
4 B-24s bomb Suribachi Airfield on Paramushiru Island, scoring hits on the runway, and blast batteries; on the return flight, 1 is hit by AA fire. 1 B-25 flies a negative shipping search. A B-24 weather airplane force-lands in the USSR.
THURSDAY, 7 DECEMBER 1944
9 bombers fly 2 negative shipping searches.
SUNDAY, 10 DECEMBER 1944
VS ID-13 operated as VS-70 at N.A.S., Kodiak, 'till 10 December 1944 when relieved by VS-48 detachment SIX. (From base history)
MONDAY, 11 DECEMBER 1944
4 B-25s fly a negative enemy shipping search.
TUESDAY, 12 DECEMBER 1944
The weather aircraft aborts the mission due to the weather.
WEDNESDAY, 13 DECEMBER 1944
4 B-25s weatherabort a shipping search.
WEDNESDAY, 20 DECEMBER 1944
A B-24 flies armed reconnaissance over the Kurile Islands; another B-24 strikes Onnekotan Island installations, while 2 more flying armed photo mission over Kashiwabara, Paramushiru Island, and Katoaka, Shimushu Island also strafe buildings on Onnekotan Island and bomb Nemo Bay. 4 B-25s abort a fighter-decoy mission due to weather.
SATURDAY, 23 DECEMBER 1944
The weather mission finds squall conditions and is aborted.
FRIDAY, 29 DECEMBER 1944
3 B-25s on a fighter decoy mission abort due to weather; 2 of them are missing on the return flight. A B-24 bombs Katoaka on Shimushu Island in the Kurile Islands.
MONDAY, 1 JANUARY 1945
5 B-24s fly coverage for a naval force upon aborting a bomb mission to the Kurile Islands.
WEDNESDAY, 3 JANUARY 1945
B-25s fly coverage for a naval force over the Kurile Islands.
FRIDAY, 5 JANUARY 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 4 B-24s fly an air coverage mission for a naval task force on its approach to Suribachi on Paramushiru Island.
SATURDAY, 6 JANUARY 1945
On Paramushiru Island, 2 B-24s bomb Suribachi Bay Airfield, also hitting buildings and pier areas. 10 B-25s fly single air coverage sorties for a naval task force.
TUESDAY, 9 JANUARY 1945
For the first time the Eleventh radar-bombs with H2X equipment as 4 B-24s hit Suribachi Bay Airfield on Paramushiru Island.
WEDNESDAY, 10 JANUARY 1945 FTP SITES
3 B-24s on an armed photo mission bomb and photograph Kurabu Airfield on Paramushiru Island, scoring hits on the runway.
THURSDAY, 11 JANUARY 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 3 B-24s on an armed reconnaissance to Suribachi on Paramushiru Island, bomb NW of Taro Lake; 5 B-25s hit Kotani Shima.
15 JANUARY 1945
YP-73 lost at Kodiak
THURSDAY, 18 JANUARY 1945
3 B-24s fly an unsuccessful reconnaissance mission to Kurabu Airfield on Paramushiru Island; one of the B-24s force- lands in the USSR on the return trip.
FRIDAY, 19 JANUARY 1945
1 B-24 flies a radar ferret mission over Shimushu and Onnekotan Islands in the Kurile Islands; 2 other B-24s hit Matsuwa and Onnekotan Islands.
SATURDAY, 20 JANUARY 1945
4 B-24s bomb the Kataoka area on Shimushu Island, Kurile Islands.
TUESDAY, 23 JANUARY 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 1 B-24 flies a reconnaissance sortie along Onnekotan Island-Matsuwa Island E coasts; 4 B-24s strike the Kakumabetsu cannery and targets on Paramushiru Island; 8 to 10 fighters intercept and the B-24s claim 2 victories; 1 B-24 is lost.
WEDNESDAY, 24 JANUARY 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 4 B-25s on a lowlevel attack on Torishima Island abort due to mechanical trouble; 4 more B-25s bomb buildings on Torishima; AA fire damages 2 B-25s. In the Aleutian Islands, 6 fighters take off after radar reports an unidentified target SE of Attu Island; they spot a balloon which they shoot down with tracers.
MONDAY, 5 FEBRUARY 1945
5 B-24s bomb Kataoka on Shimushu Island in the Kurile Islands through solid overcast; a shipping sweep by B-25s is cancelled due to weather.
WEDNESDAY, 7 FEBRUARY 1945
6 B-24s off to Kataoka, Shimushu Island abort the mission when all aircraft accidentally drop bombs prior to the bombing run. 4 B-25s weather abort.
THURSDAY, 8 FEBRUARY 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 4 B-25s abort a mission to the Masugawa River when unable to identify the target.
SUNDAY, 11 FEBRUARY 1945
Of 7 B-24s off on an air cover mission for a naval task force, only 3 reach the target.
MONDAY, 12 FEBRUARY 1945
B-25s cancel a cover mission for a naval force because of weather.
WEDNESDAY, 14 FEBRUARY 1945
3 B-24s bomb and photograph Suribachi Airfield on Paramushiru Island, Kurile Islands (the secondary target).
SATURDAY, 17 FEBRUARY 1945
4 B-25s provide air coverage for a naval task force en route to Paramushiru Island.
SUNDAY, 18 FEBRUARY 1945
7 B-24s fly cover sorties for a naval force during its approach to Kurabu Cape, Paramushiru Island.
MONDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 6 B-24s fly photo reconnaissance over Shimushu Island and bomb Kurabu Cape Airfield on Paramushiru Island; 6 Japanese fighters intercept; the B-24s claim 4 damaged. 4 B-25s weather-abort a mission to hit targets along the Hayakegawa River.
FRIDAY, 23 FEBRUARY 1945
YC-693 was lost off Alaska, February 1945, and stricken from the Navy List, 23 February 1945
SATURDAY, 24 FEBRUARY 1945
4 B-25s on a shipping sweep attack the Hayakegawa River in the Kurile Islands; returning, the B-25s sight and photograph a Japanese bomb-carrying balloon.
TUESDAY, 6 MARCH 1945
A mission to the Kurile Islands is cancelled due to inclement weather.
WEDNESDAY, 7 MARCH 1945
In the Kurile Islands; 8 B-25s, dispatched to strike a reported convoy, abort due to weather; so do 8 B-24s after departing on a shipping sweep and a strike on Kataoka, Shimushu Island.
FRIDAY, 9 MARCH 1945
3 B-24s fly a negative shipping search.
SATURDAY, 10 MARCH 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 5 B-24s radar-bomb targets at Kataoka on Shimushu Island, and Suribachi and Kakumabetsu on Paramushiru Island with unobserved results; 1 fighter is sighted but no attack is made; 2 other B-24s on this mission abort due to weather and mechanical trouble. B-25 missions to the Hayakegawa River and Paramushiru are also cancelled due to weather.
WEDNESDAY, 14 MARCH 1945
Of 12 B-25s taking off to cover a naval task force on its way to Matsuwa Island in the Kurile Islands, 6 abort due to weather and failure to locate the task force; the others fly coverage sorties throughout the day.
THURSDAY, 15 MARCH 1945
1 B-24 flies air coverage for a naval task force; 7 others weather-abort.
FRIDAY, 16 MARCH 1945
Because of a navigational error, 2 B-24s on a photo mission to Matsuwa Island reach 130 miles (209 km) S of the island, the deepest penetration of the Japanese Home Islands to date; the B-24s turn N, photograph Matsuwa Island and bomb Shimushiru Island with unobserved results.
SATURDAY, 17 MARCH 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 2 B-24s fly bombing and photo missions over Matsuwa Island, concentrating on the airfield, and on returning photograph Shasukotan, Harumukotan, and Onnekotan Islands.
SUNDAY, 18 MARCH 1945
A weather sortie is flown.
MONDAY, 19 MARCH 1945
5 B-24s bomb and photograph the Kashiwabara naval base on Paramushiru Island. 8 B-25s bomb canneries along the Masugawa and Asahigawa Rivers.
FRIDAY, 23 MARCH 1945
An 8-bomber strike is called off due to weather.
MONDAY, 26 MARCH 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 2 missions, each by 4 B-25s, attempt to bomb canneries on the Masugawa and the Hayakegawa Rivers; fighters drive off the Masugawa mission and the other mision cannot find the target due to weather. 4 B-24s bomb the Kataoka naval base on Shimushu Island.
THURSDAY, 29 MARCH 1945
6 B-24s bomb Kataoka naval base on Shimushu Island; 8 B-25s weatherabort a mission to Tomari Cape and 1 B-24 flies a radar-ferret mission along the Paramushiru Island coast.
FRIDAY, 30 MARCH 1945
8 B-25s cancel a shipping strike because of weather.
MONDAY, 2 APRIL 1945
A B-24 on weather reconnaissance returns early due to mechanical trouble; another B-24 investigates radar jamming on Kresta Point in the Aleutian Islands.
FRIDAY, 6 APRIL 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 8 B-24s attack and photograph Kurabu on Paramushiru Island, especially the airfield, while 8 B-25s hit radar installations in an all-out attack on Hayakegawa, Kotani Island, and Minami Cape, dropping napalm-filled incendiaries for the first time; buildings and shipping in N part of Hayakegawa are hit especially hard; another B-25 flies weather reconnaissance.
SATURDAY, 7 APRIL 1945
A B-24 flies a radar-ferret mission along the coasts of Paramushiru and Harumukotan Islands in the Kurile Islands.
TUESDAY, 10 APRIL 1945
In coordinated operations with US Navy (USN) aircraft, 7 B-24s napalm-bomb Kataoka naval base on Shimushu Island, Kurile Islands; 4 B-25s attempt to hit radar installations on Minami Cape on Paramushiru Island, the primary air warning station in the Kurils, but fail to release bombs due to an approach error; 3 other B-25s decklevel bomb a Masugawa River cannery; and a B-24 investigates ice floes along the Kurile Islands.
WEDNESDAY, 11 APRIL 1945
P-38s together with USN aircraft pick up bombfilled paper balloons over Attu and E of Adak Islands in the Aleutian Islands; one balloon over Attu is shot down and portions of the gondola are recovered in Massacre Bay.
THURSDAY, 12 APRIL 1945
P-38s shoot down paper bomb-balloons over Attu Island.
FRIDAY, 13 APRIL 1945
At Attu Island, 27 P-38s and P-40s scramble following radar reports of unidentified plots; later, they shoot down 9 of 11 Japanese paper bomb-balloons sighted over the W Aleutians.
SUNDAY, 15 APRIL 1945
A B-24 flies a weather reconnaissance mission.
MONDAY, 16 APRIL 1945
In the Kurile Islands, B-25s abort a mission to bomb Hayakegawa because of weather front; 6 B-24s radarbomb the Kataoka naval base on Shimushu Island; another B-24 flies a radar-ferret sortie.
THURSDAY, 19 APRIL 1945
8 B-25s off to bomb Kurile Island targets abort due to weather.
FRIDAY, 27 APRIL 1945
On Shimushu Island, 6 B-24s drop fragmentation bombs on the Kataoka naval base, 1 B-24 hits Minami Cape, and another flies a radar-ferret mission.
SUNDAY, 29 APRIL 1945
12 B-25s attempting to bomb targets in the Kurile Islands abort due to a weather front. 6 B-24s radar-bomb Kataoka naval base on Shimushu Island.
TUESDAY, 1 MAY 1945
1 B-24 flies a weather reconnaissance mission over the Kurile Islands.
FRIDAY, 4 MAY 1945
Brigadier General Isaiah Davies replaces Major General Davenport Johnson as Commanding General Eleventh AF on an interim basis.
SATURDAY, 5 MAY 1945
1 B-24 flies weather mission over the Kurile Islands.
MONDAY, 7 MAY 1945
EUROPEAN THEATER OF OPERATIONS (ETO): The German High Command surrenders unconditionally all land, sea, and air forces at Reims, France effective 9 May 45. General of the Army Dwight D Eisenhower says, "The mission of this Allied force was fulfilled at 0241 local time, May 7, 1945."
WEDNESDAY, 9 MAY 1945
In the Kurile Islands, radar discloses considerable shipping between Paramushiru and Shimushu Islands; thus, 12 B-24s take off and radar-bomb through overcast; another B-24 flies a radar- ferreting sortie over Paramushiru and Shimushu.
THURSDAY, 10 MAY 1945
The Eleventh AF and the USN's Fleet Air Wing Four execute the heaviest and most successful joint mission to date in the Kurile Islands; 12 B-24s bomb shipping targets in the Kataoka naval base on Shimushu Island, and fly photo reconnaissance over E and W Paramushiru Island on the return trip; next, 16 Attu Island, Aleutian Island-based B-25s take off; 1 aborts while the others hit shipping between Kashiwabara on Paramushiru Island and Kataoka; heavy AA fire claims 1 B-25; a B-24 and a B-25 force-land in the USSR.
TUESDAY, 15 MAY 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 13 B-24s bomb the Kashiwabara, Paramushiru Island-Kataoka, Shimushu Island area, claiming one ship destroyed, and a direct hit on another, and investigate radar activities. Low fog limits observation of other results; AA fire damages 2 B-24s, 1 of which forcelands in the USSR.
FRIDAY, 18 MAY 1945
8 B-24s bomb naval, harbor, and airfield targets at Kataoka on Shimushu Island; another B-24 searches for enemy radar along the Kurile Islands.
SATURDAY, 19 MAY 1945
8 B-25s try to bomb Minami Cape radar installation and cannery on the Naka River on Shimushu Island; only one gets near the targets and bombs and strafes the area, while intense AA fire and enemy fighters drive off the rest and down 1 B-25; another B-25 is missing and a third reaches Petropavlovsk, USSR.
WEDNESDAY, 23 MAY 1945
7 B-24s radar-bomb the Kataoka naval base area on Shimushu Island while another flies a radar-ferret mission in the same area.
FRIDAY, 25 MAY 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 2 B-24s fly a radar ferret mission over Matsuwa Island and bomb the Tagan Cape area; another B-24 flies armed weather reconnaissance.
TUESDAY, 29 MAY 1945
4 B-25s weather abort a shipping sweep along the E coasts of Paramushiru and Shimushu Islands.
JUNE 1945
Kodiak submarine base decommissioned and Woody Island net depot disestablished.
FRIDAY, 1 JUNE 1945
A 4-plane shipping strike is called off due to weather.
SUNDAY, 3 JUNE 1945
On Shimushu Island in the Kurile Islands, 1 B-24 flying a radar ferret mission to Kataoka is followed by 8 others, radar- bombing and photographing scattered targets in the naval base area; 7 B-25s take off for an attack but 4 are turned back by weather and the others low- level bomb a Masugawa River Cannery.
MONDAY, 4 JUNE 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 8 B-25s abort a shipping strike at Kurabu Cape on Paramushiru Island due to weather; 11 B-24s, however, get through and radar-bomb Kataoka naval base on Shimushu Island.
SATURDAY, 9 JUNE 1945
In coordination with US Navy surface and air forces attacking in the Kurile Islands, 6 B-24s and 8 B-25s fly extensive armed weather reconnaissance and anti-shipping sweeps over Kurabu and Otomari Capes, Ichinowatashi, and Asahigawa on Paramushiru Island; the B-24s score no results, half of them jettisoning their bombs; the B-25s then fly a diversionary bombing mission over Araido Island where they are attacked by 8 Japanese fighters; to evade them, the B-25s fly over Kamchatka where Soviet AA fire shoots down one, killing its crew; another damaged B-25 crash-lands in Petropavlovsk. This is the first time Soviet AA hits a US aircraft.
SUNDAY, 10 JUNE 1945
2 B-24s fly with the US Navy's Fleet Air Wing Four bombers on a shipping attack and sink NICHIEI MARU #5 off the SW coast of Paramushiru Island, Kurile Islands.
MONDAY, 11 JUNE 1945
8 B-24s on a shipping sweep over the Kurile Islands do not find targets because of overcast and instead radar-bomb installations on Kurabu Cape, Paramushiru Island and in the Kataoka areas of Shimushu Island.
TUESDAY, 12 JUNE 1945
4 B-25s strafe shipping off Paramushiru Island, near Arahata Cape, damaging 4 freighters and 2 barges; one of the B-25s is shot down.
SATURDAY, 16 JUNE 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 4 B-24s bomb and strafe shipping off Suribachi Bay, Paramushiru Island and a radar site on Minami Cape, Shimushu Island; one of the B-24s crashes into the water; 4 B-25s on a shipping strike score near misses on a freighter in Asahi Bay and bomb targets along the Torishima Chain; mechanical failures force 2 of the B-25s to fly to Petropavlovsk, USSR.
SUNDAY, 17 JUNE 1945
4 B-25s bomb shipping near Kataoka, Shimushu Island; one ship (KONGO MARU) is observed exploding, another burns after a strafing run; 4 other B-25s fly a shipping sweep from Shimushu to Kurabu Cape, Paramushiru Island; a number of vessels are sighted but cannot be attacked because of land-based AA.
MONDAY, 18 JUNE 1945
6 B-24s join US Navy aircraft in attacking Kataoka, Shimushu Island and Tomari Cape, Paramushiru Island; cloud cover prevents observation of effects; 1 B-24 flies a radar-ferret mission over the Kurile Islands.
TUESDAY, 19 JUNE 1945
In a coordinated shipping search, a B-24 flies the theater's longest mission, a 2,700-mile (4,345 km) roundtrip lasting 15.5 hours and flying as far as Uruppu Island, Japan; turning N the B-24 bombs a small convoy 25 miles (40 km) SW of Shimushu Bay, Shimushu Island, Kurile Islands, sinks a vessel, heavily damages another, and sets 2 more afire; another B-24 bombs and photographs Matsuwa Island; 4 B-25s break off a shipping sweep due to the presence of Japanese fighters.
FRIDAY, 22 JUNE 1945
Major General John B Brooks relieves Brigadier General Isaiah Davies as Commanding General, Eleventh AF.
SATURDAY, 23 JUNE 1945
In the Kurile Islands, 2 B-24s on a shipping sweep between Matsuwa and Paramushiru Islands sink 1 freighter, damage 2 more, and hit a whale boat; 1 Japanese fighter is claimed destroyed; 6 more B-24s bomb Kataoka on Shimushu Island.
SUNDAY, 24 JUNE 1945
2 B-24s on a shipping sweep instead radar-bomb Kurabu Cape on Paramushiru Island, because of overcast and turbulence; another planned shipping strike by 6 B-25s is also cancelled due to weather.
Late AUGUST 1945
Soviets occupied the Kuriles after their neutrality pact with Japan expired.
THURSDAY, 30 AUGUST 1945
Captain Raymond R. Lyons, USN became CO of NAS Kodiak.
SUNDAY, 2 SEPTEMBER 1945

FINI!


Hostilities with Japan end officially with the signing of the instrument of surrender aboard the USS Missouri (BB-63) in Tokyo Bay. Youtube video of surrender ceremony.
SEPTEMBER 1945
U.S. established naval weather stations at Petropavlovsk and Siberian mainland.
WEDNESDAY, 26 SEPTEMBER 1945
The last Liberty ship to be built, the USS Albert M. Boe was launched. This is the ship now located in Kodiak named the STAR OF KODIAK.
FRIDAY, 11 April 1952
Last Saturday, 100,000 Steelhead trout eggs arrived at Kodiak and were planted in the tributaries of the Buskin River. *
FRIDAY, 15 July 1955
The SeBees are contemplating, weather permitting, starting the paving of the road from the main gate toward the town. *
FRIDAY, 1 February 1957
Commencing February 6, the KODIAK BEAR will be issued as a daily newspaper. *
THURSDAY, 20 June 1957
This issue of the KODIAK BEAR ends a 73-issue series of daily newspapers. *
MONDAY, 9 September 1963
Bicycle registration is now going on in full swing at the security office. All children, ages 8 thru 17, who reside on the Naval Station are required to register their bikes. *
FRIDAY, 1 July 1966
Capt Ira M. Rowell, commanding officer, and LCdr E.L. Martin, supply officer, conducted ceremonies aboard the station opening Kodiak's new fuel pier and cold storage plant. *
FRIDAY, 29 July 1966
The latest thing in Coast Guard Cutters, the USCG CONFIDENCE, checks in here for duty next Tuesday. She is one of 27 new cutters being built for the Coast Guard and boasts clean, simple lines and many of the latest shipbuilding ionnovations. *
FRIDAY, 25 November 1966
USA Homes was open for a two day inspection visit by the public. About 200 persons visited the model during the first hour. Occupation is planned to get under way this month. *
FRIDAY, 23 June 1967
The weatherman at Fleet Weather Central, Kodiak, have traded their rules of thumb and outdated equipment for Atomic Picture Transmission (APT) receivers and facsimile recorders and have enlisted the aid of ESSA weather satellites in predictiing weather. *
FRIDAY, 30 June 1967
The U.S. Navy's incomparable 'Blue Angels' landed at the Naval Station Monday under a low cloud overcast and drizzle. Weather forced cancellation of their scheduled performance. *
WEDNESDAY, 27 December 1967
RAdm Donald M. White sears the ribbon to open the new On-Base School addition at ceremonies Monday evening. *
FRIDAY, 18 July 1969
The KODIAK BEAR, beginning this week, will be reduced to 8 pages per issue. *
FRIDAY, 18 June 1971
RAdm Eugene G. Fairfax will haul down 17th Naval District flag as the district staff, Alaska Sea Frontier and Fleet Air Alaska commands are disestablished 1 July. *
FRIDAY, 31 March 1972
The last edition of the KODIAK BEAR newspaper was published by the navy. Volume 31, Number 6 (with 6 pages) contained quite a lot of history articles. *
Notes:
1944 late summer: 30 PBYs to Magadan Russia via Kodiak. [ Hays, The Alaska-Siberia Connection, 26-27; Hays, Alaska's Hidden Wars, 116. ]
News articles from these years at infoplease.com:
1900 - 1901 - 1902 - 1903 - 1904 - 1905 - 1906 - 1907 - 1908 - 1909 - 1910 - 1911 - 1912 - 1913 - 1914 - 1915 - 1916 - 1917 - 1918 - 1919 - 1920 - 1921 - 1922 - 1923 - 1924 - 1925 - 1926 - 1927 - 1928 - 1929 - 1930 - 1931 - 1932 - 1933 - 1934 - 1935 - 1936 - 1937 - 1938 - 1939 - 1940 - 1941 - 1942 - 1943 - 1944 - 1945 - 1946 - 1947 - 1948 - 1949 - 1950 - 1951 - 1952 - 1953 - 1954 - 1955 - 1956 - 1957 - 1958 - 1959 - 1960 - 1961 - 1962 - 1963 - 1964 - 1965 - 1966 - 1967 - 1968 - 1969 - 1970 - 1971 - 1972 - 1973 - 1974 - 1975 - 1976 - 1977 - 1978 - 1979 - 1980 - 1981 - 1982 - 1983 - 1984 - 1985 - 1986 - 1987 - 1988 - 1989 - 1990 - 1991 - 1992 - 1993 - 1994 - 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 - 2006 - 2007